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Coping with everyday work issues


David Morrill
(@wolf1476)
Moderator
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 41
Topic starter  

How do those who work cope with everyday stress and workloads at your jobs?


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MB
 MB
(@mbjohnson823)
New Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 1
 

Hi David.  I just joined VEDA today; this is my 1st post.  I am currently home on a Medical LOA from work, recovering from recent PLF repair surgery.  I have been persevering now, for 2.5 yrs, since my closed head trauma, that resulted in  multiple Vestibular diagnoses (which  took over 2yrs and multiple specialists (seems to be the norm) to be diagnosed). I have a high level -functioning occupational position and have officially reached a breaking point in performing those duties, due to said disability.  Coping with Everyday Work Issues (topic), is not going well, to answer your inquiry.    Along with being at a cross-roads with succumbing to permanent disability, acceptance of facing an abrupt career -ending change, comes secondary mental health struggles to overcome in coping with these outcomes.   Not to mention financial impact.  Then there is the stigma of this invisible disability.    Trying to explain over -and -over again to people why I am not yet back to work.    I was surprised to not see more Forum topics on work-related support. So- Thank you for starting this thread.  I welcome support from any removed link   Encouragement from others out there that gave up their career, and successfully adapted?   What about Occupational Accommodations if I do go back?  Is there ADA support out there?


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David Morrill
(@wolf1476)
Moderator
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 41
Topic starter  

@mbjohnson823 hi sorry to hear that all these things and stresses are going on in your life right now.I know all too well about job loss and adapting to new challenges in your life as I went through similar challenges in my life. There are organizations out there that do help, but your right they have to recognize invisible illnesses like ours. Wishing you nothing but good will as you move forward, and welcome to VEDA!


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ZigmudLeic
(@zigmudleic)
New Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 2
 

Hi,David. Stress is part of my work (I work in a hospital). So I just deal with it... Thanks to hospital management, we can work from home with employee monitoring software. ( The data part- specifically. filling out diagnostic reports and the patient's recovery process only. And of course a second shift where we work directly with patients.


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ZigmudLeic
(@zigmudleic)
New Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 2
 
Posted by: @zigmudleic

Hi,David. Stress is part of my work (I work in a hospital). So I just deal with it... Thanks to hospital management, we can work from home with employee monitoring software. ( The data part- specifically. filling out diagnostic reports and the patient's recovery process only. And of course a second shift where we work directly with patients.

During last month there was too much stress....
All hospitals here are full of COVID-infected people. And looks like there will be 1-2 more waves 


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Sandy
(@sandybrunner)
Active Member Patient Forum Moderator
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 6
 

@mbjohnson823

Hi!  I left my career as a school speech-language pathologist to become an entrepreneur, hoping to work on a more flexible schedule.  There are definitely challenges to starting a business (the main one being financial uncertainty), but I feel much better symptom-wise and without the stress of job factors that were out of my control.  I was really happy that I took the leap this year to create my own gig.  

I recently discovered The Job Accommodations Network - https://askjan.org/

They can help support you with questions if you decide to go back to your workplace.  

Good luck!


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Alli2ells
(@alli2ells)
New Member
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 1
 

I’m a district nurse ,I was diagnosed with BPPV last March and though the lockdown I have been treated for this at my local hospital in a TRV chair ,after my last treatment 2 weeks ago I was left with very bad vertigo ,nausea .I asked last time how many more times I would be put in the chair as I didn’t feel it was helping ive been in it 5 times now , it was one ear now it’s both ! Because my job involves driving and I’m a manager my Gp has signed me off and prescribed betahistine , my next session in the chair is 1/6 . I was told one option could be surgery . 
after 35 yrs of nursing if I can’t be clinical then I may be pushed to a desk job , I am anxious this may end my career at 53 ! I hope it doesn’t come to that but this condition is so unpredicatable and like you say hidden ,no 2 days are the same ... 

Allison . 


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Brenda
(@bree)
Eminent Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 23
 

Hi Allison, how horrible to have this happen during the beginning of the pandemic no less. My name is Brenda. I sought out many professionals before I got the correct diagnosis. I hope that you have support while going through this. Getting a correct diagnosis is very, very important. I have vestibular migraines and my career was ended but many, many people work with vestibular diagnoses. My symptoms got worse before they got better. Try to keep the stress down. Meditation, relaxation exercises and deep breathing. I hope this helps

 

 


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vicki
(@vicki)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 5
 

Hi Allison,

I, too, am a nurse and this Monday, August 14th, will be my 14th "anniversary" of dealing with my vestibular dysfunction!  I was told early on with my issues that I should retire and go out on social security disability but I worked too hard and loved what I did too much to give up that quickly.  I fought like hell and have learned to compensate and change my life style as much as possible so that I could function to the best of my ability even though each day is different.  I know some of my triggers and stay clear of them but like everyone else it seems with this problem there are times where I get hit out of nowhere and have to deal with my symptoms.  Hardest part is living with such unknowns and of course the fact that so many of our symptoms and problems are invisible to the naked eye so we  come across as looking "normal" while are insides are spinning and moving out of control.  Unfortunately I was furloughed in March 2020 during the height of the pandemic and following 2 orthopedic surgeries soon after have been out of work which I miss terribly.  I am now pursuing going back to my nursing career but am finding that trying to obtain employment while balancing my vestibular issues doesn't work too well.  I have been offered a position which I crave but the travel time would throw me off and I would not be safe to travel so I am being forced to turn the job down.  This of course has affected me emotionally and I feel like a failure since my brain wants the job and I know I could do the job but my body won't allow me to follow through.  Trying to get the ideal position of functionality as well as travel time so that I can function too will be more than difficult and trying to explain this to others seems to be futile.  I feel betrayed by my body and am considering whether it is time to give up the nursing career that I love so much.  This hurts and I find it is extremely difficult to really have others truly understand the impact this disease has on the entire person and life.  I'm trying right now to just deep breath and be glad for the good I have instead of what I am missing.


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