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Covid-19 Vaccine side effects

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Vestibular.org
(@dizzilizzy)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 7
 

After the first Moderna vaccine I had severe vertigo for 5 weeks.  At 4weeks I had the second Moderna vaccine, 2 days later I had an ocular migraine with no headache, and 2 days after that I finally woke up without vertigo. But it took five weeks from the initial vaccine to become whole again.

the vertigo was the worst I have ever had.  I found I could not read or do any work involving detail.  When I could walk, Usually later in the day, I found that working outside was beneficial and the vertigo would clear up only to have it reappear each morning.

But I am good now. Thankfully.


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foxy.chicago
(@lewfox)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 1
 

@sandram

I will relate my  recent experience.

 2nd Pfizer shot March 3: walked 3 miles (normal for me) 

       next 2 days fatigue and sore shoulder not as bad as first shot.

 Day 2 in afternoon got a spell of vertigo while doing a yoga exercise, head down and off to left while on my back. pretty scary.

After severals of being uncomfortable i called nurse line and internet md service on recommendation of nurseline. She prescribed meclizine (little effect). Next day.

I was ok as long as i kept vertical(I slept in a chair for 2 nights. I tried to stay vertical as much as possible and had a few mild episodes.

I found this website and pretty much confirmed my vaccine shot and the vertigo were correlated.( I am indebted to the site for the reassurance as wife thought it might be related to my tumor)

As each day progressed i felt a little better. I slept with a huge pile of pillows. I am gradually reducing the pile.

I am typing this March 15 and feel better (almost back to normal since March 12)and hope it is gone.

I was hoping to add this for others who sound as concerned as i was ( am)

as to how long it will last.

I also spoke to my neurologist to see if I was the only one he knew of (none so far) with the problem.


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Pamela
(@kissme)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 4
 

@beenvaccinated today is my 4th day after my 1st Moderna vaccine.  This happened to me within 10 minutes of my vaccine.  I stumbled at the pharmacy.  I thought I had low blood sugar.  I ate and went 3 hours and it got really bad. I lost my comprehension,  spinning like I jumped off a merry-go-round.  Today it came back at physical therapy.  I made a dr appt and my Dr put off my 2nd dose an extra 4 weeks. I'm thinking I'm not taking it 

 


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Pamela
(@kissme)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 4
 

I got it immediately from my moderna vaccine.  It's still bad. 


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Pamela
(@kissme)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 4
 

I had my 1st Moderna shot 4 days ago. U stumbled and thought my blood sugar was low in the 1st 10 minutes.  3 hours later I was spinning like I jumped off a merry-go-round.  I stumble over words, forget what I'm talking about.  Dizzy as hell. I did not have these issues before my vaccine.  I see my Dr Thursday in 2 days. He told me to not get my 2nd dose for an extra 4 weeks.  I may not get it at all. After 2 weeks I'm at 50% and 4 weeks at 92.5% covered off the 1st dose.


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Lyne
 Lyne
(@cpowers)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 3
 

So good to find this site.  I had the Moderna vaccine.  1 week before I had 1st shot, I experienced vertigo and seemed to getting better after seeing a PT and an Eply maneuver. Then I had the shot, and I had 1 month worth of severe headaches and dizziness - pretty sick, could not function for a good portion of the day, daily.   I did research and I think I had Vestibular Migranes.  Went to my Dr. and was put and Amtripline for migranes.  I improved after started new med for migranes and then I had the 2nd shot and again the headaches/dizziness came back.   I’m not a Dr. but I think my system was already comprismised with the vertigo, and the Moderna shots brought on the headaches/dizziness.  


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Dizziness
(@lweiss)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 3
 

@soraya


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Dizziness
(@lweiss)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 3
 

@soraya I had the exact same side effects my  lump has decreased and after two weeks I am having some relief from the dizziness and headaches. Vitamin c and over the counter migraine medicine really helped. I also have been drinking Gatorade.


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Michael K
(@michaelk)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 57
 

This is from the Washington Post and thought I would share it, at worst I do not think it can hurt you. I have done 1/2 t ginger powder in water for 2 days and may have seen some improvement but it is too early to tell. For me I have some good days and bad and the last 2 have been good. I will let you know in a few more days.

 

HOW GINGER FIGHTS VERTIGO

 
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February 28, 1989

If all that comes to mind when you think of a winter cruise is a queasy stomach, you may find solace in ginger. In folklore, ginger has a formidable reputation as an anti-nausea agent. According to Albert Leung, an independent consultant in plant pharmacology, ginger has been used for centuries in the Orient to combat seasickness. "It's quite common today," he says, "to see people in boats around Hong Kong munching on preserved ginger." Dr. James Duke, an authority on medicinal plants at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, says: "Legend has it that commercial fishermen at sea would chew on a slug of ginger root to ward off decidedly unprofitable bouts of seasickness." Is there any truth to it? Surprisingly, yes. The evidence is good and getting better. In 1982, two researchers at Brigham Young University and Mount Union College in Ohio demonstrated that powdered ginger root was better than Dramamine -- a common anti-motion-sickness drug -- at suppressing motion-induced nausea. In their test, they put people highly prone to seasickness in a whirling tilted chair, a motion that brings on stomach-turning sensations. Twenty minutes prior to that, they gave the subjects either a placebo (with no pharmacological value), Dramamine, or powdered ginger root -- the same stuff you get at the supermarket, except it was in a capsule. The dose of ginger was about a gram -- or half a teaspoonful. None of the volunteers who took Dramamine or a placebo lasted in the twirling chair for six minutes without vomiting or becoming nauseated. Half of those who took the ginger did. One of the investigators, psychologist Daniel Mowrey, then at Brigham Young, thinks the ginger somehow "interrupts the feedback between the stomach and the nausea center of the brain." A later double-blind study in 1986 at Odense University in Denmark, found that ginger blocked vertigo in all of eight subjects, apparently by affecting the inner ear, which is also implicated in motion sickness. Such laboratory studies are well and good, but the real truth is revealed only on the high seas. So that's where the Danes went next -- to 80 green naval cadets "unaccustomed sailing in heavy seas." In a recently published report of the double-blind study, the Danish researchers recount how one day out of port as the ship hit high seas, they gave 1 gram of ginger root to one group of the rookie sailors and a placebo to another group. Then they examined them for symptoms of seasickness every hour for four hours. Sure enough, ginger root reduced the severity of seasickness by suppressing vomiting, cold sweating, nausea and vertigo. The most pronounced effect was control of vomiting -- dampening it by 72 percent. Over all, they pronounced ginger 38 percent protective against the symptoms of seasickness. The Danish scientists note that the pharmacological component in ginger that combats motion sickness is totally unknown. However, they say it takes effect within 25 minutes and lasts for at least four hours. Duke recommends putting half a teaspoon of powdered ginger in tea or another beverage. If you use fresh grated ginger root, you need twice that much, he says. More convenient are capsules of ginger often sold in health food stores. According to Mowrey, two or three capsules, each containing 500 milligrams of powdered ginger, should do the trick -- if taken about half an hour before encountering the motion. He cautions against swallowing the dry ginger plain, noting it could burn the esophagus. Duke figures that a 12-ounce can of ginger ale or ginger beer may also contain enough ginger to prevent motion sickness in some people more effectively than 50 to 100 milligrams of Dramamine. Curbing motion sickness is not ginger's only pharmacological asset. In animal tests, ginger lowers blood cholesterol; in test tubes it is an antibiotic, very effective against salmonella, the bacteria that frequently contaminate eggs and chickens. (Could that account for the Chinese wisdom behind ginger chicken?) Ginger is a strong antioxidant, says Duke, perhaps giving it some anti-cancer properties. But in certain medical circles ginger is best recognized as a blood thinner. A few years ago, Dr. Charles R. Dorso, then at Cornell University Medical College, noticed that his blood did not coagulate as usual. He traced the effect to eating large quantities of ginger marmalade that was 15 percent ginger. In tests, he found that ginger behaved like an anticoagulant: It reduced the tendency of blood platelets to stick together. He attributed the effect to gingerol, a ginger compound chemically structured like aspirin, a well-known anti-clotting agent. Several studies confirm ginger's potent ability to manipulate prostaglandins, body chemicals that help control blood cell stickiness and clumping. A scientist even suggested recently in a medical journal that ginger replace certain drugs that act on prostaglandins, because of their dangerous side effects. Ginger is designated by the government as GRAS, which stands for "generally recognized as safe," and has few documented side effects. In combatting motion sickness, it reportedly does not cause drowiness, as some drugs do. Eating Right appears on alternate Tuesdays.

This post was modified 1 year ago by Michael K

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Bo
 Bo
(@bonniek)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 19
 

I just received the vaccine on March 5th of this month 2021. On March 8th I was turning over in bed on awakening and the room was spinning. I have sense been the PCP today and all she really did was listen to me and say it was vertigo from an inner disorder, most likely from the vaccine. I had already tried meclazine, and the Epley Manuever. As of today I have my days. During the day doesn't seem to be as bad, evenings a bit more pronounced. She stated there was so much we didn't know about the vaccine so I was a possibility. She's only treating my symptoms saying it's most likely fluid in the inner ear or crystals. Should I push to be seen by an ENT? Thanks ahead of time for this forum and all of your valuable information, It has really helped me to solidify the fact that this vaccine is the culprit. Prayers and hope to all this affected. Bo


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Bo
 Bo
(@bonniek)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 19
 

@dizzilizzy What made you get the second shot? Didn't you feel like it would be worse? That's what I fear. 


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LindaAnn
(@lindaann)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 5
 

I’m just updating you that I’m still having mild dizziness/lightheadedness/mild nausea etc. after a month and a half after first Moderna vaccine. My doctor agreed with me that a second shot might not be a good idea. I’m so grateful for the support found here and especially for the reminder that studies show a good level of protection after just one shot. As you get older, risks of a fall—and the consequences of falling even inside your own home—can be devastating without adding severe dizziness. I just don’t understand why this is being downplayed and dismissed in every arena, especially when targeting the older, more vulnerable populations. It leads me to think either info is being deliberately withheld or the study is not as meticulous as it should be. There seems to be no effort to find out why this is happening. It’s especially disturbing to read here how many doctors deny there’s any correlation to the vaccine with no knowledge about this whatsoever-and when it seems so obvious to us here who’ve never experienced this before the vaccine. I did make a formal report to VAERS today and hope the authorities and the press will begin to inform the public and the medical communities of the dangers of this scary and life-altering side effect. You are all amazing and I’m praying for you all!! And so grateful for you. Without you I would not have understood what had hit me and would be much more distressed. It’s still distressing to realize the experts don’t know why this is happening, when and if it might end and if it might signal more serious underlying problems or prognoses. 


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Vikki
(@victoria)
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@bonniek


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Vikki
(@victoria)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 2
 

My story is almost the same as yours.  I have been suffering for approximately 3 weeks now.  I have been to the Dr. 3 times.  I thought I was better, but today proved me wrong.  I am now using a walker and starting steroids.  It has been crazy!  I am also suffering from nausea.  I just wonder if this is from the covid vaccination.  Was surprised to so many other people suffering from this.   My Dr. Feels this will eventually subside, but to keep in touch with him.  

 


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RobertBurnsOB
(@robertburns)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 1
 

I had my 2nd Pfizer shot 3 weeks ago to the day.  This evening at the computer I started feeling very dizzy and felt it advisable to crawl rather than walk.  After several hours the condition is a little improved.  I'm 67 and thus worried about strokes, but after reading this forum I get the distinct impression that I'm experience a reaction to the inoculations.  After each inoculation during the 15-minute waiting period I felt some dizziness but nearly as severe as this evening and not delaying my departure.  Anything but a stroke!  I read online about vestibular problems causing 95% of the E.R. admissions for dizziness, but I don't have a known vestibular problem.


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