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News Updates: Health & Wellness

Living With a Sound You Can’t Turn Off

Posted by Kerrie Denner

PERSONAL HEALTH Jane Brody on health and aging.

Shortly after my 70th birthday, a high-pitched hum began in my left ear. I noticed it only during quiet times but soon realized that it never went away.

An ear, nose and throat specialist (otolaryngologist) examined my ears and took a thorough medical history that included questions about noise exposure and drugs I take. An audiologist checked my hearing.

Don’t Just Sit There! Move for Your Health

Posted by Kerrie Denner

Had an exhausting day? Think you deserve to kick back and relax? You might want to think again. If you’re like most people nationwide, you’ve spent more than half of your waking hours sitting or inactive for long stretches of time—at work, at school, in the car or watching TV or another type of screen. Maybe it’s time to try standing up instead of putting your feet up.

Scientists estimate that Americans ages 12 and up now spend most of their time—about 8 to 10 hours a day—sitting and doing things that require little energy. The groups who sit the most are teens and older adults.

Migraine-associated brain changes not related to impaired cognition

Posted by Kerrie Denner

NIH-funded study tracks nearly 300 people for nine years

Women with migraines did not appear to experience a decline in cognitive ability over time compared to those who didn’t have them, according to a nine-year follow up study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

The study also showed that women with migraine had a higher likelihood of having brain changes that appeared as bright spots on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a type of imaging commonly used to evaluate tissues of the body.

Migraine-associated brain changes not related to impaired cognition

Posted by Kerrie Denner

NIH-funded study tracks nearly 300 people for nine years

Women with migraines did not appear to experience a decline in cognitive ability over time compared to those who didn’t have them, according to a nine-year follow up study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

The study also showed that women with migraine had a higher likelihood of having brain changes that appeared as bright spots on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a type of imaging commonly used to evaluate tissues of the body.

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