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Sadie
Active Member
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 5
Topic starter  

Hello,

My name is Sadie.  I am a 49 year old female.  Last Wednesday I was sitting at the kitchen peninsula typing when all of a sudden I thought the world was ending.  I was thrown from my stool, everything was moving and I couldn't figure out what way was up.  It didn't last long and I got my bearings but was nauseous and shaken up.  My husband took me to the emergency room and they told me I had BPPV.  They weren't super-helpful, so I had a video appointment with my family doctor today and she wasn't much help either.  

I would fine with the diagnosis but from everything I read, I haven't come across anyone that says it can be violent like mine. I didn't turn my head or make any movement that would case this to happen.  It was absolutely terrifying.  I really did think the world was ending.  I can't imagine what would have happened had I been driving.  

Someone please tell me whether or not this was normal for BPPV, and if not, what should I do next.

I appreciate any help, advice, or support.

Thank you! <3


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Karen R. Mizrach
Active Member Patient Forum Moderator
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 10
 

Hi Sadie

I'm sure that was terrifying. BPPV can come on suddenly without any obvious trigger. Have you had a cold or sinus infection? Sometimes a virus will trigger the event. The incident may just be a one time thing, or may recur at a later time. At this point a consultation with an Ear Nose Throat doctor who works with balance disorders may be helpful. 

 

If it happens again, try to stay calm, stay seated or propped up reclining, and breathe slowly to control anxiety. 

 

Karen


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Ms. Jennifer Robbins MPT
New Member Professional Member
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 3
 

If the ED team and your PCP suggested it may be BPPV, it's safe to try vestibular rehab. Once you try some things with the PT, it could shed more light onto the specifics of the causes. He/she can let your Doctors know. It could still help. It's best not to wait to long to  start. 


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randatlas
New Member
Joined: 4 weeks ago
Posts: 4
 

Hi, Sadie,

Often in the ER they tell you that you have BPPV because that's about all they know about vestibular disorders. They would have to be knowledgeable enough to test you for it and give you that diagnosis. A cold, virus or sinus issue makes sense to me, like Karen was asking you about. 

I agree that a visit to an ENT who knows vestibular, or a neuro-otologist, if there is one near you, would be a good thing to do. They could rule some things out and hopefully diagnose what occurred.

I understand how scary an attack like that feels. If it ever happens again, try to stay grounded (feet on the floor, hands on the chair) -- or if you can, stand up, lean against a wall, allowing as much of your back side and your hands to press against the wall. Above all, don't panic, breathe slowly and try to focus on a spot on the wall. Chances are if you do these things the episode will be short lived. 

Take care and stay safe.

Sincerely,

Randy

This post was modified 3 weeks ago by randatlas

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Sadie
Active Member
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 5
Topic starter  

Goodness, I never got a notice that anyone had replied.  Thank you all!

I did have another episode this past Friday.  Didn't panic this time.  I was riding in the car with my husband.  I had him drive to the destination.  Then I was nauseous for the next hour or two.  

I have an appointment with my GP this Thursday.  No one has even looked in my ears at this point.  My ears have been bothering me a little bit and I've had swollen glands on and off.  I hope it is just a low-grade infection.  I would love if any of you could recommend any questions or requests I should make while at my appointment.

Thanks again to all of you.  It is so nice to have support.  


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Karen R. Mizrach
Active Member Patient Forum Moderator
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 10
 

@naturegirl247

 

Ask your doctor about referring you to an ENT doctor. That's often where people begin this process. If the problem is inner ear in origin the ENT will be a good resource. But, if it's more a central nervous system disorder, you may get referred eventually to a neurologist. It can be a matter of ruling out other disorders before getting a definite answer. Many people benefit from Vestibular Therapy, which is done by a physical therapist who specializes in these issues. Let us know how the appointment goes. 


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Sadie
Active Member
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 5
Topic starter  

@krmizrachgmail-com

Thanks!  After examining me and determining that I do not have an ear infection, my GP scheduled an MRI (this coming Wednesday) and if that doesn't show anything, I go to the ENT.  I am getting more symptoms.  I am feeling dizzy/queasy, headaches, flushed face.  Still scared.


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Sandra Bacchi-Varrialle
Joined: 4 months ago
Posts: 6
 

Start with a vestibular and balance specialist first. It will save you a lot of time, money and aggravation. If you need help finding one in your area, please let me know. I can help you. 🙂


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Sadie
Active Member
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 5
Topic starter  

@sandstorm, thanks, Sandra.  Unfortunately, I am at the mercy of my doctors and to whom they refer me.  The good news is that I have great health insurance and the Minneapolis removed link Paul area has top-notch health care. 

My MRI was normal.  I see an ENT tomorrow and I suspect the ENT will refer me to a vestibular therapist. 

The more research I do, including posts on the Facebook Vestibular Disorders Support Group, the more I think this is related to my perimenopause. I guess we'll see what the professionals have to say.

BTW, this forum does not allow me to respond to PMs.  Thank you so much for checking in on me.  I'm feeling much less scared.  My biggest concern at this point is whether I'll ever be able to drive again. 


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Sandra Bacchi-Varrialle
Joined: 4 months ago
Posts: 6
 

I am glad you are feeling less scared! 


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