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Stress Triggers

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(@wolf1476)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 53
Topic starter  

What types of activities make you anxious and panicky? And how do you cope with those activities or how do you reduce your stress during those activities?


   
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(@paul80)
New Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1
 

I used to be stressed many times because of work. That made me extremely tired. I had a lot of negative emotions and thoughts that kept coming to me. I was from a healthy 92kg person to only 68kg. My body was like a dead body, mentally sluggish. I used to find a lot of ways to reduce stress by taking antidepressants, going to bed early, doing easy exercise, but nothing changed. Seeing me like that, my girlfriend was very worried and asked all over the forums. Someone told me to listen to relaxing music combined with yoga and meditation. My girlfriend said that I could give it a try. Miraculously, I felt like I was immersed in music. My soul was cleansed, all worries disappeared. I didn't expect the way to deal with stress was so simple. I'm not sure if this will work for everyone, but hopefully, someone who is stressed can give it a try to clear their mind. Thank Clara so much! The playlists that I've been playing recently are: Relaxing Music

This post was modified 3 years ago 2 times by Jones Paul

   
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(@dragokarl)
New Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1
 

 I felt like I was immersed in music. My soul was cleansed, all worries disappeared. I didn't expect the way to deal with stress was so simple. I'm not sure if this will work for everyone, but hopefully, someone who is stressed can give it a try to clear their mind. 

and there is therapy for depression and mood 

Expressive Therapy For Depression


   
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(@vicki)
Active Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7
 

Funny one of the most stressful situations is when I know I have a day of travel in front of me.  Traveling is extremely difficult.  In a plane it is going through a busy airport with all the distractions besides the long tiredness of travel.  That night I must eat early and decompress and rest in quiet and hit the bed early.  Luckily the next morning my brain normally re-boots and I am back to "normal".  When I travel by car it actually is worse.  The light flashing between the trees catch my eyes and it acts like a strobe light. My perception of speed as a passenger is thrown off so I feel like I am on a roller coaster with quick turns, accelerations and stops which my body is constantly trying to compensate for.  When I get out of the car I still feel like I am moving.  Once again the travel day is a lost day to me and by later in the day I am have nausea and must eat lightly and early before I can not tolerate any food which of course doesn't help either.  Knowing I have a trip ahead of me (my son and grandchildren live 5 hours away) gives me anxiety since I know I have a day ahead of me of feeling sick.  It's hard for others to totally understand that I only want to go see his family once maybe twice a year.  I realize this is my way of life but at times I wish I could run from it!


   
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(@williamhunt)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1
 

Thank you for telling me about it.


   
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(@hannahschubert)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 7
 

Common activities that can trigger anxiety and panic include public speaking, driving in heavy traffic, socializing with large groups of people, and flying on airplanes. To cope with these activities and reduce stress, there are several strategies that may be helpful:

  1. Practice relaxation techniques: Deep breathing, meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, and other relaxation techniques can help reduce anxiety and promote a sense of calm.
  2. Challenge negative thoughts: Anxiety is often fueled by negative thoughts, so learning to challenge and reframe those thoughts can be helpful. For example, instead of thinking "I'll make a fool of myself if I speak in public," try reframing it as "I can handle this and do my best."
  3. Plan ahead: If you know that a particular activity makes you anxious, it can be helpful to plan ahead and prepare as much as possible. For example, if you're afraid of flying, you might research the safety statistics of air travel, familiarize yourself with the flight process, and pack a bag of calming items to bring with you.
  4. Seek support: Talking to a trusted friend, family member, or therapist about your feelings can be a helpful way to reduce anxiety and feel more supported.
  5. Engage in regular exercise and self-care: Engaging in regular physical exercise, eating a balanced diet, getting enough sleep, and engaging in activities that you enjoy can all help reduce overall stress and promote a sense of well-being.

 

 

 


   
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(@emilymckenzie)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 1
 

David, thank you for offering to discuss this topic. I'm sure most people are stressed right now. I'm not an exception.


   
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(@mimran)
New Member
Joined: 11 months ago
Posts: 2
 

My brother took stress management therapy so I can provide information on how stress management counseling can help individuals cope with activities that may cause them to feel anxious or panicky.

Stress management counseling is a therapeutic approach aimed at helping individuals identify and manage stressors in their lives effectively. When faced with activities that trigger anxiety and panic, people can benefit from various strategies offered in stress management counseling. Here are some techniques that might be employed:

  1. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): CBT is a common therapeutic technique used in stress management counseling. It helps individuals recognize negative thought patterns and replace them with more positive and realistic ones. This can help reduce anxiety and panic related to specific activities.

  2. Relaxation Techniques: Counselors may teach relaxation techniques like deep breathing exercises, progressive muscle relaxation, or guided imagery. These techniques can be employed before or during anxiety-inducing activities to promote a sense of calm and reduce stress.

  3. Exposure Therapy: For those struggling with specific activities, exposure therapy may be used in counseling. This involves gradually exposing the person to the anxiety-provoking activity in a controlled and safe manner, helping them desensitize and become less anxious over time.

  4. Mindfulness Meditation: Mindfulness practices can be useful for managing stress during activities that trigger anxiety. Practicing mindfulness involves staying present in the moment without judgment, which can help individuals maintain focus and reduce stress during challenging situations.

  5. Time Management: Learning effective time management skills can be essential in reducing stress related to overwhelming activities. Counselors may help individuals prioritize tasks, set realistic goals, and break down larger tasks into manageable steps.

  6. Coping Strategies: Stress management counseling may involve developing personalized coping strategies for handling anxiety and panic during specific activities. These strategies could include positive self-talk, assertiveness training, or seeking social support.


   
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(@zakimasood)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 1
 

Certainly! I used to get anxious during public speaking and social events. Here's what helps me:

  1. Deep Breathing: Inhale for 4 counts, hold for 4, exhale for 4.
  2. Visualization: Imagine a successful outcome before the event.
  3. Progressive Muscle Relaxation: Tense and relax muscles from toes to head.
  4. Mindfulness: Stay present, let thoughts pass without judgment.
  5. Stress Management Course: I took a course for effective techniques.

If you're interested, here are stress management courses:

  1. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR)
  2. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Stress
  3. Relaxation Techniques and Meditation Classes
  4. Stress Management Course

Remember, what works varies, and seeking professional help is okay too.


   
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(@abhimanyu)
New Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 2
 

@zakimasood Yes zaki, even i have started practicing these things after reading about these thing on some website,  to control my social anxiety and stage fright and things have started to get better for me. I can recall how I used to get panic attacks when trying to do public speaking or trying to give a presentation, my legs used to start shaking , I would ge get all sweaty and stutter.


   
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