Vesties’ Village

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therapy for coping

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(@vicki)
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Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

Just saw my Neurologist today and we discussed how I have been handling my vestibular issues for the past 15 years.  He told me he felt that he's known me long enough and that I should seek out a therapist to talk to for coping mechanisms.  I am very high functioning for a vestibular patient however I am very aware of all the compensations I do on a daily basis and the mask of smiling and acting like I am okay so that I can "look and act" normal to others.  Inside I know that I am adjusting my life and doing subtle things so that I do not seem "off" as all vestibular patients do.  He feels that after so many years of holding my emotions close to me,venting to someone impartial, my husband listens but he is of course emotionally attached, would be beneficial.  I am curious if anyone else out there went for professional help and did it help?


   
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(@wolf1476)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 53
 

Hi, another great way is to talk with members of your peers or other vestibular patients. Check out the list of available support groups on vestibular.org. Wishing you all the best!

 


   
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(@vicki)
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Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

@wolf1476 

I appreciate you reaching out.  Unfortunately there are no support groups locally for me which is why I was hoping someone on-line could tell me if they had any success with a therapist.


   
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(@wolf1476)
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 53
 

@vicki VEDa also has online support groups that work great if you want to try that.


   
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(@vicki)
Active Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

@wolf1476 

Thank you, I will look into that.  Appreciate your insight.


   
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(@hannahschubert)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 7
 

It's great to hear that your neurologist has recommended seeking therapy to cope with your vestibular issues. Dealing with a chronic health condition can have a significant impact on your emotional well-being, and it's important to prioritize your mental health alongside your physical health.

 

Many people have found therapy to be beneficial in coping with chronic health conditions. Therapy provides a safe space for you to express your thoughts, emotions, and concerns without judgment. A therapist can provide you with tools and coping strategies to better manage the emotional challenges associated with vestibular issues, and help you develop healthy ways to cope with the adjustments and compensations you make in your daily life.

 

Talking to a therapist who is impartial and not emotionally attached to you, like your husband, can offer a different perspective and allow you to explore your thoughts and feelings in a supportive and non-biased environment. Therapy can help you gain insight, develop resilience, and learn new ways to manage stress and emotions related to your vestibular issues.

 

It's important to note that therapy is a highly individualized process, and different people may have different experiences. Some individuals may find therapy to be incredibly helpful, while others may not find it as effective. The key is to find a therapist who you feel comfortable with and who understands your unique experiences with vestibular issues.

 

If you're considering therapy, it may be helpful to do some research and find a therapist who has experience in dealing with chronic health conditions or vestibular issues. You can ask for recommendations from your neurologist, primary care physician, or other trusted healthcare providers like  https://www.riviamind.com/ . Additionally, you may want to consider different types of therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which focuses on identifying and changing negative thought patterns and behaviors, or acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), which emphasizes mindfulness and acceptance of difficult emotions.


   
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(@mindykahn)
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Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 3
 

having a hard time dealing with a new way of life


   
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(@libbyboyd)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 40
 

Many people with vestibular problems have turned to professional therapists to help them cope and find emotional support, which can be helpful. If you're facing these types of challenges, seeing a therapist can help you better understand your emotions and develop coping strategies.


   
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