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Covid-19 Vaccine side effects

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(@brucekeller)
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Joined: 3 years ago
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This sucks. I had gotten symptoms of Bell's Palsy (or extremely small chance it's guillain-barré) 2 weeks after my 1st Pfizer shot, but it only lasted 2 weeks, so it wasn't THAT bad.  Basically pressure / tingling in inner ear and extended to most of the left side of my face, no real paralysis, although I did bite my lip pretty much every day it was going on.

Fast forward 6 months later and I get a pretty bad respiratory infection that gave me an asthma attack almost every day for a few weeks and bam, relapsed my symptoms except now it's been going on almost a MONTH.  It seems anytime I get stressed out or something, it gets worse. It's only almost gone when I first wake up.  This sucks, because I think this is going to be with me for life now.  I really hope it doesn't or at least doesn't progress into full blown Bell's with a droopy face and all.  I had never had a reaction like this before to a vaccine and nothing happened like this after the J&J shot (relapse didn't happen until about 2 months after that).  Hope no one else has to go through this. Wishing I hadn't gotten the Pfizer one and just went with J&J instead, but dummy me didn't think it was available at the time. I guess that's what I get for being lazy?  I dunno, it stinks, also puts me in a bad mood whenever it flairs up, and I'm normally pretty laid back. 


   
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(@jennifergrnd)
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I don’t now about anyone else or if it’s just me or I’m going crazy but lately I have been having lots of body twitching, muscle spasms, weakness in my hands, vibration’s legs and feet also it feels like I’m getting tremors in my hands they shake and not until a few days ago I realized it all happened after I got my 1st COVID vaccine Pfizer. It’s been 3 weeks now and, 3 weeks ago is when I got the vaccine that’s the only thing I have done differently to my body was inject it with that crap ! I regret getting it. I’m going to see a neurologist for all these issues and figure out what I can do and make sure the vaccine didn’t cause any damage to my nerves or something. I got a MRI a week ago and it was normal these spasms are driving me crazy. Anyone else with similar side effects?


   
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(@sickofthis)
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Posted by: @adelaide

@sickofthis I was “lucky” that my dizziness has not been intense and there has been no room spinning vertigo symptoms. My dizziness has been more of a light-headed, swaying sensation noticeable only when walking, but not when stationary. It can feel like I’ve had a few beers or like walking on the deck of a lightly rocking boat. I also have tinnitus in the left ear, although I am like some others on this forum in being able to live with that if the balance issues are sorted out.

I suspect that time along with physical activity are the things that help the most, although the timeline can vary for different people. I was queasy for 3 months, but at least that gradually went away. The balance retraining exercises have helped diminish the symptoms, although I only had contact via email with a vestibular physiotherapist for the first few months and his view was “try any exercises that keep you moving”. That helped to some extent, although progress is not linear and it can feel like a case of 2 steps forward, 3 steps back with better days followed by worse days (particularly if you are tired).

I am now seeing a vestibular physiotherapist in person and that has helped since she did a detailed assessment in person rather than online. (The ENT specialist also conducted an office-based assessment when I first saw him). She thinks I am a “visual” person who relies mainly on the eyes for balance and movement, whereas some people naturally rely more on proprioception without them knowing it. The exercises I’m now concentrating on involve optokinetic videos, balancing on one leg, and using a wobble cushion.

One advantage of seeing an ENT is that they should be able to figure out whether your problem is vestibular and related to the inner ears. Others have different views, but I was not desperate for any formal diagnosis since I was almost certain I knew what the problem was based on my symptoms so being told I had “unilateral vestibular hypofunction” or “vestibular neuritis” weren’t as helpful to me as being advised to stay away from drugs that masked symptoms and delayed the process of natural recovery over time. Incidentally, my GP, the ENT specialist, and both vestibular physiotherapists all thought there was little doubt my problems were caused by my body's inflammatory reaction to the vaccine and they have all seen many cases of people with such problems so at least I haven't faced denial from medical staff!

Thank you for the reply. From the sounds of it, we have a similar dizzy symptom. I also read your initial post and it seems that we never really had anything too debilitating, just more annoying than anything (which I am thankful for). You have been battling this for a while, how has your light headedness progressed up to this point? Would you say you are close to 100%?

How about other symptoms, have you had any head pressure or brain fog? I did, and it seems like those went hand in hand with my light headedness. As one got worse, so did the others. I think I am going to keep my ENT visit just to confirm or rule out that it is from the vestibular system. Thanks for the advice.


   
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(@lookingforanswers)
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@charsen hello I hope you are doing ok and this a good day. Like you I have lost a lot of weight. I’ve been able to stop the weight loss but can’t seem to put any on. I got 2 vax in July. Have you been able to stop the weight loss? I also sleep and wake up every couple hours. I would love to hear from you. 


   
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(@steske)
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@chelsun I’ve also been diagnosed with POTS as a result of my Pfizer booster.

I’m only 1.5 months in but the fact you have improved, and so quickly has given me hope. I just wish I could get good sleep to help my body along (broken and light at the moment). 

I read a fb comment on a dysautomnia support group a few days ago that POTS brought on by the vaccine can last around 6-10 months. I’ll take 10 months of hell to have the rest of my life back without this. 

I’m only 30. 


   
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(@nickpaul)
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Posted by: @elena1690

@nickpaul 

 I did an ultrasound of the arm where the injection was, my muscles are normal, but the doctor says that this is nerve damage.

@elena1690

Did your doctor say any more?  E.g. is this nerve damage due to the syringe needle physically hitting a nerve in the arm, or due to something else?  And, will it repair or recover?  I've been wondering if my injection site is still sore due to inflammation; alongside also wondering whether inflammation could be the cause of the other symptoms I experience (which trouble me a lot more than the sore arm, but I'm still curious as to what is going on with the arm).

 


   
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(@nickpaul)
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Posted by: @sunrise
Posted by: @nickpaul

@marisanna21 

My GP prescribed 40mg of Citalopram (increasing from starting dose of 20mg), and Psychiatrist additionally introduced 15mg of Mirtazapine, taken at bedtime.  As I saw someone else report in their own case, it was the Psychiatrist who said this is not "just anxiety" and likely has physical causes, and returned me to the physical doctors. 

This psychiatrist is a very good doctor!

Because everyone can make very simple observations: it is normal to feel fear sometimes, and fear is actually an instrument of survival. And in difficult life conditions, such as when health problems occur, concern is natural.
Something else: there are many articles about researchers looking to map the brain, that is, for example, to identify areas of the brain that are more involved than others in the genesis of certain feelings. For example, the amygdala is a region of the brain that plays a role in fear.

Another observation: when a man drinks a glass of wine, why does he do it? To feel better, as feelings. To change how he feels. That is, certain substances, such as alcohol, obviously act in certain areas of the brain and change how a person feels.

There are people on this forum who have noticed that the feelings of fear, panic, they feel are not correlated with what naturally triggers fear.

I mean, of course, everyone has a health concern and everything that happens, but some say they have a quiet life situation and what they feel appears "out of nowhere", sometimes suddenly, unjustified, so it's something very different.

That is why it is very natural to understand that, in the context of symptoms such as: pressure on the head, headache, brain fog, sensation of electric current, burning sensation in the head, high temperature and all the other symptoms of the head, which have been described, lead very strongly to the assumption that the brain areas, which play a more important role in the genesis of the feeling of fear, are somehow disturbed, physically, organically.

Or maybe there are substances, from this inflammatory phenomenon, maybe, from the brain or that reach the brain, and that act as chemical mediators of anxiety, for a while, until they are inactivated.

@sunrise

Yes, I was grateful to the psychiatrist because she got other doctors to move beyond "it's just anxiety".  In addition to what you say above, my ENT Consultant explained to me that the brain can perceive a problem in the vestibular system and the resulting symptoms including dizziness, nausea, vision problems and more, as a massive threat and launch the flight or fight response - dumping adrenaline etc into the body, and causing anxiety and panic attacks. 

 


   
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(@nickpaul)
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Posted by: @tennyson77

@nickpaul I disagree that it's permanent for most people.  When they gave me steroids, all my symptoms disappeared and I felt like I did pre-vaccine.. Once the steroids tapered off the symptoms of vertigo and dizzyness slowly came back.  To me that means it's inflammatory or immune-mediated.  I did the vestibular rehab and I don't think it really helped all that much, probably because there was still some underlying issue.  But I hope it works for you.

@tennyson77

Thanks for the reply.  Yeah, I simply don't know at this stage.  i.e. whether damage to my vestibular system is likely permanent as my ENT consultant thinks (he thinks the hair cells in the labyrinth are damaged) or whether in fact maybe there is no permanent damage, and symptoms of dizziness, nausea and all the rest are down to inflammation. 

In a way, I'd rather think the latter because it's a 'nicer' thought than thinking you've been permanently damaged.  But also I'm grateful for the hope offered that, if it's the former, then vestibular physiotherapy could be a path to recovery by helping the brain to compensate.  

I started the therapy today.  It certainly flared my symptoms, as it is intended to do, big time.  The physio had me move my eyes left-right, up-down, etc, while keeping my head still.  Sitting up, it was too much to bear, so she had me do the exercises lying down.  The room span, my vision pulsated, and the nausea was 8/10, though I was not actually physically sick.  I could only do each exercise for about 20 seconds.  I think I'm starting from a low baseline, and might have a long road of physical rehabilitation ahead of me.  I'll launch myself into that, if that's what it takes, no problem.  But finding out that inflammation was the cause all along, and as it settles down so do the symptoms, I would take that very happily. 

I had mentally logged with interest your earlier post about taking the steroids and symptoms disappearing.  My GP is happy for me to also get an opinion from an Immunologist as to whether there is anything inflammatory or immune-mediated going on.  I asked the GP whether steroids or IV immunoglobulin could be a potential route to try, and he wants the Immunologist to weigh in on this.

ENT hopes to see some improvement in my symptoms and functionality after six weeks of vestibular physiotherapy, which would also be about the same timescale as when my antibody levels from the vaccine should drop below 50, as per the antibody theory you and others on here discussed previously.  I hope via one route or another to make some progress, and start re-engaging with a fuller life. 

How are you getting on after your booster shot?    

 


   
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(@tennyson77)
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Posted by: @nickpaul
Posted by: @tennyson77

@nickpaul I disagree that it's permanent for most people.  When they gave me steroids, all my symptoms disappeared and I felt like I did pre-vaccine.. Once the steroids tapered off the symptoms of vertigo and dizzyness slowly came back.  To me that means it's inflammatory or immune-mediated.  I did the vestibular rehab and I don't think it really helped all that much, probably because there was still some underlying issue.  But I hope it works for you.

@tennyson77

Thanks for the reply.  Yeah, I simply don't know at this stage.  i.e. whether damage to my vestibular system is likely permanent as my ENT consultant thinks (he thinks the hair cells in the labyrinth are damaged) or whether in fact maybe there is no permanent damage, and symptoms of dizziness, nausea and all the rest are down to inflammation. 

In a way, I'd rather think the latter because it's a 'nicer' thought than thinking you've been permanently damaged.  But also I'm grateful for the hope offered that, if it's the former, then vestibular physiotherapy could be a path to recovery by helping the brain to compensate.  

I started the therapy today.  It certainly flared my symptoms, as it is intended to do, big time.  The physio had me move my eyes left-right, up-down, etc, while keeping my head still.  Sitting up, it was too much to bear, so she had me do the exercises lying down.  The room span, my vision pulsated, and the nausea was 8/10, though I was not actually physically sick.  I could only do each exercise for about 20 seconds.  I think I'm starting from a low baseline, and might have a long road of physical rehabilitation ahead of me.  I'll launch myself into that, if that's what it takes, no problem.  But finding out that inflammation was the cause all along, and as it settles down so do the symptoms, I would take that very happily. 

I had mentally logged with interest your earlier post about taking the steroids and symptoms disappearing.  My GP is happy for me to also get an opinion from an Immunologist as to whether there is anything inflammatory or immune-mediated going on.  I asked the GP whether steroids or IV immunoglobulin could be a potential route to try, and he wants the Immunologist to weigh in on this.

ENT hopes to see some improvement in my symptoms and functionality after six weeks of vestibular physiotherapy, which would also be about the same timescale as when my antibody levels from the vaccine should drop below 50, as per the antibody theory you and others on here discussed previously.  I hope via one route or another to make some progress, and start re-engaging with a fuller life. 

How are you getting on after your booster shot?    

 

In terms of that theory I posted, there are ACE2 receptors on those hairs in the inner ear - so if there are anti-anbibodies attacking ACE2, that may be why it's triggering vertigo in some people.  There has been some recent research published talking about the ACE2 receptors there and how it may be related to vertigo in COVID and vaccine recipients.

I'm on day 8 now since my booster shot of Moderna.  I'd say I've had a slight regression these last few days in terms of some symptoms - my vertigo has been triggered a bit lately, especially at close distances.  But outside I feel almost 100% back to normal still (in that nothing feels like it's swaying, and even things in the distance seem real and sharp - that wasn't always the case).  And after dealing with this for six months, I feel like I'm much better able to cope with whatever side effects I'm feeling.  But at this point after my second shot in July of 2021, I was in the hospital.  So I suspect this week will be sort of the worst in terms of what I feel, then hopefully smooth sailings after that.  But so far I'd saw I only have a 10% regression, if that, and hopefully it goes away in a week or two. But I'll update then.  

I have another anti-body test on Friday, so I'll see how much the booster raised them all - I think I was down to 300 before, and I expect to be back to 10,000 level.

 

This post was modified 2 years ago 2 times by altennyson

   
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(@jacquelynsauriol)
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This forum is sponsored by the WHO who brought you the jabs in the first place.

Here is a good interview on the footballers falling, and some honest talk, this will get me kicked  off

so bye

https://www.redvoicemedia.com/video/2022/02/professional-athletes-dropping-left-right-pro-footballer-commentator-goes-on-the-record/?utm_source=right-rail-latest


   
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(@nickpaul)
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Posted by: @sherig

@sickofthis 

After several visits to ENTs with no consensus on diagnosis, (BPPV, Labyrinthitis etc), I went to a "neuro-otologist" who ordered VNG and caloric testing.  The test did reveal 30% damage to my right inner ear.  (I had 7 mos of vertigo after J&J among other side effects).  At least this test showed definitive damage.  I had gone to vestibular therapy throughout the ordeal (of some very debilitating vertigo) but ultimately, I think it was time that was most restorative.  My tinnitus is louder than ever and I don't expect that to ever go away.  I wish you the very best of luck!

@atp223 @sherig In response to @sickofthis you each said your ENT doctors confirmed damage or problems with your left / right (respectively) inner ear and / or vestibular system.  I am curious whether this correlates with the side of the body where you had your Covid vaccination.  My ENT has diagnosed a problem in my vestibular system on the left side, I had my vaccination in my left arm.  The distance from the upper arm to the ear on the same side of the body is of course not far.  I'm wondering if something in the vaccine travelled the short distance to the ear and caused the damage or inflammation. 

I'm aware this might argue against the more systemic inflammation throughout the body theories, and maybe it is too simplistic to be correct.  Like 99% of us I am not a doctor, and we are in part having to figure this out for ourselves.  I'd be interested in anyone else's knowledge, experience, or theories, on the same ...

And, on that point, I'd add my voice to others to thank everyone on this forum for all the information, ideas and support.  It is so valuable and appreciated - hopefully every one of us can benefit in some way from the collective.

 


   
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(@atp223)
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Both shots were in my left side and all the damage (vestibular, eye, ear fullness) was left side. Most of my doctors say that since the reaction was six days after my second dose it was my immune system generally and not something related to where the shot was…HOWEVER, our pediatrician made that connection as well and suggested we vaccinate my children in the thigh. 

My 6 year old was really annoying about it, so we compromised on one shot in left arm and one in right arm just to mix it up. We also spaced his doses 7 weeks (I was aiming for 12, but I wanted him to have the second dose before school started because of omicron). However, my 3 year old doesn’t know any better and she will be getting her shots in the butt or thigh.


   
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(@adelaide)
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@sickofthis Hi again – it’s hard to put a percentage on things, but it’s definitely not close to 100% since it can vary throughout the day and I can have a few worse days followed by a few better ones and I suddenly think I’m finally “cured”. As a general rule, mornings are better until about lunch time or sometimes into the afternoon, with evenings worse as I get tired. Sometimes the symptoms aren’t noticeable or are less intense. I expected compensation to be quicker and for some people it can only take a couple months with others needing longer. Nevertheless, I definitely felt worse the first few months and progress has been slow, but it has occurred gradually.

Other than the lightheaded swaying dizziness I described (and tinnitus in the left ear), I have had no headaches, brain fog or any of the other symptoms people have described on this forum. I have no problem driving, sitting, standing or even walking up and down stairs – mine is only when I’m walking. I read some of your posts and your symptoms seem to have been worse or more extreme than mine, at least at the start. Mine are chronic, but perhaps “low level” compared to those others have faced. 

As mentioned, I was certain my symptoms were the result of an inflammatory reaction to the vaccine since I also got a nasty cold sore, which I sometimes get when I’m fighting any type of virus. Although I’ve never had a virus hit my inner ear, it can occur after a cold or flu. Some people have it after Covid infection and obviously it can occur after the various vaccines! My understanding is that inner ear system is very delicate so any inflammation can cause vestibular problems that can last for some time. As the ENT told me, even if the inflammation diminishes, you can still have the problem.


   
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(@adelaide)
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@ladyd Hi there - I wanted to see how things are going with you? It sounds like you're still dealing with it! I've posted the past few days and can report that things are generally a bit better and I've started seeing a vestibular physiotherapist in person rather than having "email consultations" as I had before. She did a full assessment and found I have decent balance function in many areas, but am still overly dependent on my eyes for movement and balance - some people apparently naturally rely more on proprioception and other senses so they compensate quicker than those of us who are "visual people". She's encouraging me to do more balancing and other exercises with eyes closed and also to watch optokinetic videos. Cheers.

 


   
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(@tennyson77)
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@nickpaul I had my Johnson and Johnson shot in the left arm, and the damage was to my right ear.  That said, the vertigo only happened on my next shot, which was Moderna, and I had that in the right arm.


   
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