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Covid-19 Vaccine side effects

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 alia
(@sunrise)
Very Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 223
 

@asanders 

I think it's good to keep NAC going. When a remedy plays an important role, then it is best to take it, possibly following if it changes the symptoms.
The right treatment in MCAS is found by testing.
Various antihistamines are tried.
The dose of antihistamine may be higher than the usual dose.
Cromolyn and Ketotifen are really worth a try.
Of course, it must always be said, these are just the information and opinions I have, you have to decide in a personal way.
As long as the symptoms only appeared after the injections, often so fast, the first assumption is MCAS, no mastocytosis, I think.
There are differences between MCAS and mastocytosis in laboratory tests.
The sensation of heat is a symptom of inflammation, also an effect of histamine.
Try not to think about worries, the body is also very strong and has so many resources to heal.
As someone once said: "you don't even know how much the body can carry".


   
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(@good-kitty)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 23
 
Posted by: @plandistry
Posted by: @sunrise
Posted by: @plandistry
Posted by: @gingerjones
Posted by: @mina

@lookingforanswers yes, i have seen a lot of doctors but they don’t want to link it to the vaccine. I pray we will heal with time. Stay strong. 

If you look through the many pages, there are numerous people that have had gut issues...seems to be one of the main problems...I myself had them for a good three months...I lost a LOT of weight...my GP gave me a prescription for prilosec for a month...after that, I started on a probiotic and H1/H2 antihistamines...gut health is much, much better...

H2 Famotidine/PepcidAC stabilizes mast cells in the gut as the primary action of it. During the COVID outbreak it was very common to see people with gut issues related to the virus and spike protein and Famotidine was the best course of action for this, even in a hospital setting. Also it was part of the Marik Protocol, which was crucial during the pandemic.

Probiotics are essential in my opinion, a key to both mental and physical health. However many probiotics are histamine triggers so one should be careful and research the strains. In addition, virtually every commercial yogurt we've tested doesn't offer many beneficial bacteria by the time they reach the consumer.

There are only 2 probiotic products I ever recommend;

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003V5EEHQ/

and

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07L8MMCZV/

Both of these are careful to avoid histamine triggers.

Hi, Everyone!

I would like to add some links that show how important this therapeutic approach could be.

Histamine intolerance and mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) are two types of conditions that some people suffer from, but which often go undiagnosed.

There are many sites that list symptoms that can be induced by mast cell-released mediators (histamine and many other mediators).

Some such symptoms are: vertigo, tinnitus, headache, anxiety, neuropathic pain, paresthesia, difficulty in concentration, forgetfulness, sleeplessness, difficulty in focusing, tremor at rest, tachycardia, muscle pain, bone pain and so on.

A complete list of symptoms, for example:

https://www.mastzellaktivierung.info/en/symptoms.html

Other links:

Dr. Lawrence Afrin discusses with Dr. Mobeen about MCAS:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cX6uZKInI7c

Mast cell activation disease: an underappreciated cause of neurologic and psychiatric symptoms and diseases:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26162709/

Covid-19 hyperinflammation and post-Covid-19 illness may be rooted in mast cell activation syndrome:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32920235/

MCAS can be investigated in the laboratory, so it can provide objective diagnostic elements.

The treatment is very individual and is therefore based on the diet of low histamine, antihistamines H1 and H2, cromolyn, vitamin C with prolonged release and others.

One detail that I think is well known, but it is good to remember, is that anti H1 antihistamines can affect the ability to drive a car.
Another interesting link is about a dietary supplement called luteolin, not very expensive, which can be effective in brain fog (luteolin is something different from lutein, that well-known supplement that helps eyesight):

https://iubmb.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/biof.1726

Lyme disease is also referred to as MCAS, as it is associated with chronic multi-systemic inflammation.

 

One of my specialties is Mast Cell Pathology. This is something I discussed within weeks of the COVID outbreak in that almost the entirety of COVID pathology points to a Mast Cell Activation Syndrome Disease. Thus, the majority of my early protocols were entirely based on stabilization of Mast Cells.

Hydroxychloroquine itself 'extends' Mast Cell Lifespans, thus reducing the degranulation cascade. 

The missing piece to my research was that we may be dealing with a Mast Cell Activation Disease with vaccine injured patients. This was made abundantly clear with the summation above. In fact, the symptoms of post-vaccine injury almost all correlated precisely WITH a Mast Cell Disease - almost a perfect 1 to 1 parity! Even the tinnitus part of it seems to point to this.

I believe we could be approaching a major breakthrough on this.

The good news is - there are major amounts of therapies, modalities, supplements and medications that can fully address Mast Cell Diseases, focused primarily on elimination of the diseases themselves and restoration of normal life. One thing I want to stress - in my past research on Mast Cell Degranulation - I found that a wide range of 'modern life' aspects induced granulation. Everything from GMO's, Food Additives, EMF (5G, etc), Environmental Stress of Offices, Positive Ionization, pollution, all of it...

The good news is - there are powerful mast cell stabilizers as mentioned above. Liposomal-C is very potent, Cromolyn is excellent, Clemastine is probably one of the best H1's (Tavegyl), etc.. I'd be VERY curious to have someone get an IV Vitamin C drip and see if it elicits positive change. I read some doctors doing IV Vitamin C during COVID were actually arrested by the FBI in the USA.. Very weird, and very suspicious about why they are so triggered by Vitamin C in IV/Liposomal form in COVID/Long COVID/Vax? Please research folks.. There is a wealth of data available out there, and we could be on the verge of discovering what this does to the body, and how to mitigate it.

@plandistry I've been reading your posts with a lot of interest. Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge!

I stumbled across Dr Afrin and the idea of a possible MCAS link a few months ago and bought his book Never Bet Against Occam. I was shocked how many case studies reflected my bizarre constellation of symptoms. I wanted to share my progress since then.

I'm now seeing an excellent naturopath. She sent me for an organic acids test. Some significant findings:

My oxalates (specifically, oxalic acid) was off the charts. 10x out of range! Alongside that, my arabinose was out of range (high) and my vitamin C was almost non-existent - despite taking 500-1000mg/day since Nov.

She suspects that I may have a low-grade candida infection (that I could well have had prior to the vaxes) that could have gone crazy after the shots and caused all kinds of mast cell reactions.

It's interesting to me that at the height of my misery 3-8 weeks post-vax, I developed extreme histamine-intolerance from foods. A grilled cheese sandwich with a teeny bit of sauerkraut put me out of commission for days with terrible stomach cramps.

To share the Rx for my individual situation, she has put me on the following:

- NFH Candida SAP (2 caps 3x/day)

- VitaAID Ultra PB100+DF probiotic (1 scoop 2x/day)

She has also recommended Vit C, glutathione and B12 IV drip. I am going to start a series in the next few weeks. Will report back here.

(One thing I am a bit concerned about is reading that high doses of Vit C can actually elevate oxalic acid levels. I wonder if different forms of the vitamin could be an option?)

In the meantime, for anyone is interested in learning more about their risk factors/potential sources of possible MCAS, I have attached a terrific report I came across. It might ring some bells for a few other people here? 

https://www.mastcell360.com/Mast%20Cell%20360%20Guide%207%20Common%20Root%20Causes%20in%20Mast%20Cell%20Activation%20Syndrome.pdf

 

Best wishes to all.

 


   
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 Dee
(@medee)
Very Active Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 650
 

Has anyone's nerve pain and pins and needles gone away completely? 


   
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(@sickofthis)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 95
 
Posted by: @plandistry

All evidence keeps pointing to MCAS/MCAD triggered by EITHER/OR Long COVID and Vaccine. Remember, they don't want cheap/easy/free solutions, they want something Big Pharma and Medical Cartels can profit from. Right now the Vaccine Side Effect issues are generating BILLIONS of revenue for doctors, hospitals, testing firms, and the drug companies.

https://www.sciencealert.com/there-s-evidence-antihistamines-may-help-treat-long-covid-symptoms

A Common Over-The-Counter Drug Could Treat Long COVID, Case Study Reports

 

The cat is out of the bag really. Also where the issue is in the body can be largely determined by where the Mast Cells are Degranulating.

This should help pin down the proper therapy.

https://www.drtaniadempsey.com/post/clinical-manifestations-of-mast-cell-activation-syndrome-by-organ-systems

 

Common constitutional symptoms of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS) include fatigue, malaise, suddenly feeling hot or cold, inappropriate sweats, flushing, unprovoked changes in appetite or weight.

Dermatologic: Common dermatologic symptoms of MCAS include rashes and lesions of many sorts (e.g., migratory and waxing/waning patches of redness, acne-like folliculitis), itching, flushing (sometimes migratory), swelling (often migratory), pregnancy-like purplish lines/bands ("striae") about the abdomen, flanks, armpits and/or hips, redness in the track of a scratch ("dermatographism"), poor healing, and nail issues (e.g., brittleness, longitudinal ridging, "white spots" (dyshydrotic eczema); ingrown nails, too, are seen sometimes).

Ophthalmologic: Common eye symptoms include irritation and inflammation of the eyes (often described as feeling "sandy," "gritty," "dry," and usually without any clear infection to account for it), usually fairly brief episodes of difficulty focusing vision, eyelid tremors/tics ("blepharospasm"), and unusual sensitivity to either bright lights or lights of certain colors.

Otologic: Common ear symptoms include ringing in the ears and irritation and inflammation in the ears. Less common are a sense of chronic fluid build-up in the ears, hearing loss (one-sided or two-sided), or uncomfortable heightened hearing sensitivity.

Nasal/Oral: Common oral and nasal symptoms include ulcers and pain (sometimes described as "burning"), white patches about the tongue or other surfaces, swelling of the tongue or other surfaces, sensitivity and/or deterioration of the teeth and/or gums despite reasonably good attention to dental and gum hygiene, alterations in the sense of taste, throat irritation/soreness/inflammation and/or hoarseness (without any infection clearly being present to account for it), difficulty swallowing, congestion of the sinuses and nose, sores up inside the nose, and nasal and post-nasal drip.

Lymphatic: Common symptoms of the lymphatic system include a diffusely migratory, waxing/waning enlargement and/or irritation/inflammation of the lymph nodes, typically about the neck and in either armpit and to either side of the groin, but possibly in other areas, too (including in the spleen, the body's largest lymph node, which often is felt as a left upper quadrant abdominal discomfort).

Respiratory: Common respiratory tract symptoms include painful discomfort at any level of the respiratory tract, bronchitis, cough, shortness of breath (often modest and inconstant; "from time to time, I just suddenly can't catch a deep breath" is the most common phrasing MCAS patients use to describe their shortness of breath). Frank wheezing is not seen all that often, and when it's present during the episodes of shortness of breath, it's usually fairly subtle. Obstructive sleep apnea can happen, too, even in patients who are not morbidly obese.

Cardiovascular: Common cardiovascular symptoms and findings include palpitations, lightheadedness, unexplained/unexpected hypertension and/or hypotension, palpitations, chest discomfort or pain (usually non-anginal in character), vascular malformations such as aneurysms or hemorrhoids or hemangiomas or telangiectasias).

Gastrointestinal: Common gastrointestinal symptoms include pain/inflammation (often migratory) in one or more segments of the GI tract, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal discomfort/pain, abdominal bloating (usually shortly following meals), unexplained/unexpected fluctuations in appetite and/or weight, queasiness, nausea (vomiting is relatively uncommon), and diarrhea (or "soft stools") and/or constipation (often alternating). Blood in the stool can happen but is pretty uncommon.

Urinary: Common urinary symptoms include unusual frequency of urination, difficulty initiating urination, inability to fully empty the bladder, and painful urination (as if a urinary tract infection is present, except that testing can't find clear evidence of infection). Flank or abdominal pain from kidney stones can happen but is not all that common. Blood in the urine can happen but is pretty uncommon.

Genital Tract: Other than decreased libido and erectile dysfunction and possible fertility issues, genital tract symptoms are uncommon in men but may include inflammation of the prostate or other parts of the genital tract. In women with MCAS, genital tract symptoms are common and include an inflamed and/or itchy vulva and/or vagina (often mistakenly attributed to, and treated as, bacterial or yeast infections even though no evidence of infection can be found), inappropriate/dysfunctional uterine/menstrual bleeding, and painful intercourse. Endometriosis seems somewhat common, too.

Pregnancy: Women who have MCAS also can have decreased libido and fertility challenges. Women with MCAS who become pregnant sometimes experience early miscarriages, excessively severe or prolonged vomiting ("hyperemesis gravidarum"), the assortment of high blood pressure and other problems collectively called pre-eclampsia, and pre-term labor. In delivery, women with MCAS sometimes find difficulties tolerating, or getting relief from, anesthetics.

Muscular: Common muscular symptoms include migratory pain and weakness.

Skeletal: Common skeletal symptoms include migratory pain. Fractures are uncommon but can happen from loss of skeletal strength, and these include vertebral fractures which can lead to loss of height.

Joint: Common joint symptoms include migratory pain; migratory swelling and even redness, too, can happen, but usually are not as prominent as pain.

Neurologic: Common neurologic symptoms include headache (including migraines), episodic lightheadedness/dizziness/vertigo (which can happen either when getting up or even when lying down or sitting or after already been up for a while) (total loss of consciousness can happen but is much less common than lightheadedness), tingling/numbness (most commonly in the hands and feet but potentially anywhere), weakness, tics/tremors, and a wide variety of sleep disruptions (most commonly insomnia and frequent waking and non-restorative sleep but also excessive sleep, sleepwalking or sleep talking, sleep paralysis, or night terrors).

Psychiatric: Common psychiatric symptoms include anxiety (sometimes even to the point of panic), depression, mood lability, anger, attention deficit, and a wide variety of aspects of cognitive dysfunction, most commonly issues with memory, word-finding and concentration. "Disassociation" or "depersonalization" is occasionally seen. Frankly psychotic behaviors (e.g., auditory or visual hallucinations) are fairly uncommon.

Endocrinology: Common endocrinologic/metabolic issues include delayed or premature puberty, excessively painful and/or irregular periods, excessive menstrual bleeding, weak bones, thyroid abnormalities, high cholesterol or triglycerides, high glucose levels (usually diagnosed as diabetes mellitus) or low glucose levels (sometimes rapid alternation among normal and low and/or high levels), and selective abnormalities in absorbing or transporting or using certain important minerals and vitamins (e.g., iron).

Hematologic: Common hematologic and clotting system issues include modest abnormalities in blood counts, easy bruising, and easy bleeding (for example, excessive menstrual bleeding or easy nosebleeds). Excessive blood clotting is a good bit less common than easy bruising/bleeding.

Immunologic: Common immunologic issues include prolific and/or unusual sensitivities/reactivities/allergies, impaired healing, an unusual extent of autoimmune diseases, increased susceptibility to infection, and difficulty recovering from infection.

 

Mast Cell Activation Syndrome causes chronic multisystem inflammation ± allergic-type phenomena ± abnormalities in growth/development in potentially any tissue(s), so any patient who “fits the profile” and hasn’t been identified, with appropriate work-up of the various individual problems, to have any other disease which better accounts for the patient’s full range of problems is a reasonable candidate

Although I appreciate the information, I am hesitant to completely believe I have MCAS yet. All the symptoms you list above could happen for a number of different conditions. If someone is experiencing neurological symptoms (which you list several and very common ones) does not necessarily mean MCAS is what they are dealing with. There are other conditions that share some of the symptoms you list. As Dr. Affrin mentioned in his video, there are ways to test for MCAS (not easy ways, necessarily) so until completely believing that everyone who has a vaccine reaction has MCAS it may be best for people to try to get tested for it first. I am not saying you are incorrect, but am saying testing is the only (almost) full proof way of knowing.


   
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(@rainyday)
Very Active Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 136
 

Has anyone else heard that the CEO of Moderna recently dumped millions of stock and deleted his Twitter account? It makes you wonder if something is about to happen. . .


   
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 alia
(@sunrise)
Very Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 223
 

@sickofthis 

Those who have known for a long time about MCAS, how it manifests itself, and found out the side effects described after injections, immediately noticed the similarities.
The official articles linking severe covid and long covid to MCAS are additional arguments.
But things are not so simple and I think most people can only try to make the best logical observations from the data we can have.
For example, it is already known that autoimmune phenomena have been confirmed, in some cases, and these can trigger a lot of effects.
So it's not just a matter of assuming it's MCAS. There are several mechanisms that can be assumed.
About MCAS, there are about 10 lab exams helping to diagnose. Probably not all labs can do them. I know it should be harvested when the symptoms are present.
Of course, it is ideal to be able to do laboratory tests.
But maybe not everyone can find a specialist for MCAS or pay for the necessary tests, especially if some people feel so bad that they can no longer work.
Laboratory tests help, but they are not enough for diagnosis, therapeutic testing is needed.
Antihistamines are over-the-counter drugs, in the sense that they are used quite safely. But if they do not help, it means that the therapeutic test has not been passed and the suspicion of MCAS is less likely.


   
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(@lazydude)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 2
 

Hey Guys,

I had my first shot on 3/7/21 (Pfizer) second shot on 3/28/21 (Pfizer)

Did not have any symptoms from the first 2 shots, except for a headache that went away within days.  

I recently got my booster 12/23/21 because omicron was spreading and also I went on a trip where someone had covid. 

After my booster I got a headache and I figured it would go away. It did not go away. It was a all day long headache. The headache finally went away around 6 weeks after the booster. 

The problem is that my dizziness will not go away. Its there 24/7. Its a very mild dizziness. I can drive and work and everything else but it just lingers there. I'm only 7 weeks into this since my booster so definitely not as long as some people here but I hope it goes away. The last few days I've had trouble sleeping. If I do fall asleep I would wake up few hours later and it feels like I never went to sleep. The dizziness was tolerable when I had the headaches but since the headaches went away I feel it more.

I had a CT scan on my brain which came back fine and blood test also came back fine. 

I am scared but just trying to push through. This forum has been helpful and thank you to everyone on here.  

 


   
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(@lazydude)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 2
 

@tomscordi just wanted to check how you are doing these days. Thanks!


   
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 Kit
(@forest2022red)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 5
 

@megan agree 💯%


   
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 alia
(@sunrise)
Very Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 223
 

@good-kitty 

About vitamin C infusions it is known that they are generally well tolerated.
You can learn more about it, by reading about the Riordan Protocol, which means taking high doses of vitamin C, intravenuosly.
To administer more than 4 grams of vitamin C intravenously, upon one administration, it is more prudent to dose first the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.
It was also said that their studies show that, as far as oxalate is concerned, the data is quite reassuring.
It is always good to check all the information and make the personal choice.


   
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(@jackieberg)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 3
 

@paige1123 can you tell me

how long it took to go away? I have been lightheaded for 4 months now and I am wondering if it will?


   
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(@jackieberg)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 3
 

@sandram hello, can you tell me if the dizziness ever went away and how long? I am going on 5 months now and I am really wondering?

Thanks jackie b


   
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(@jackieberg)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
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@liat so wondering did it go away? I have had it for 5 months now and am really wondering?


   
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 Dee
(@medee)
Very Active Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 650
 
Posted by: @sickofthis
Posted by: @plandistry

All evidence keeps pointing to MCAS/MCAD triggered by EITHER/OR Long COVID and Vaccine. Remember, they don't want cheap/easy/free solutions, they want something Big Pharma and Medical Cartels can profit from. Right now the Vaccine Side Effect issues are generating BILLIONS of revenue for doctors, hospitals, testing firms, and the drug companies.

https://www.sciencealert.com/there-s-evidence-antihistamines-may-help-treat-long-covid-symptoms

A Common Over-The-Counter Drug Could Treat Long COVID, Case Study Reports

 

The cat is out of the bag really. Also where the issue is in the body can be largely determined by where the Mast Cells are Degranulating.

This should help pin down the proper therapy.

https://www.drtaniadempsey.com/post/clinical-manifestations-of-mast-cell-activation-syndrome-by-organ-systems

 

Common constitutional symptoms of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS) include fatigue, malaise, suddenly feeling hot or cold, inappropriate sweats, flushing, unprovoked changes in appetite or weight.

Dermatologic: Common dermatologic symptoms of MCAS include rashes and lesions of many sorts (e.g., migratory and waxing/waning patches of redness, acne-like folliculitis), itching, flushing (sometimes migratory), swelling (often migratory), pregnancy-like purplish lines/bands ("striae") about the abdomen, flanks, armpits and/or hips, redness in the track of a scratch ("dermatographism"), poor healing, and nail issues (e.g., brittleness, longitudinal ridging, "white spots" (dyshydrotic eczema); ingrown nails, too, are seen sometimes).

Ophthalmologic: Common eye symptoms include irritation and inflammation of the eyes (often described as feeling "sandy," "gritty," "dry," and usually without any clear infection to account for it), usually fairly brief episodes of difficulty focusing vision, eyelid tremors/tics ("blepharospasm"), and unusual sensitivity to either bright lights or lights of certain colors.

Otologic: Common ear symptoms include ringing in the ears and irritation and inflammation in the ears. Less common are a sense of chronic fluid build-up in the ears, hearing loss (one-sided or two-sided), or uncomfortable heightened hearing sensitivity.

Nasal/Oral: Common oral and nasal symptoms include ulcers and pain (sometimes described as "burning"), white patches about the tongue or other surfaces, swelling of the tongue or other surfaces, sensitivity and/or deterioration of the teeth and/or gums despite reasonably good attention to dental and gum hygiene, alterations in the sense of taste, throat irritation/soreness/inflammation and/or hoarseness (without any infection clearly being present to account for it), difficulty swallowing, congestion of the sinuses and nose, sores up inside the nose, and nasal and post-nasal drip.

Lymphatic: Common symptoms of the lymphatic system include a diffusely migratory, waxing/waning enlargement and/or irritation/inflammation of the lymph nodes, typically about the neck and in either armpit and to either side of the groin, but possibly in other areas, too (including in the spleen, the body's largest lymph node, which often is felt as a left upper quadrant abdominal discomfort).

Respiratory: Common respiratory tract symptoms include painful discomfort at any level of the respiratory tract, bronchitis, cough, shortness of breath (often modest and inconstant; "from time to time, I just suddenly can't catch a deep breath" is the most common phrasing MCAS patients use to describe their shortness of breath). Frank wheezing is not seen all that often, and when it's present during the episodes of shortness of breath, it's usually fairly subtle. Obstructive sleep apnea can happen, too, even in patients who are not morbidly obese.

Cardiovascular: Common cardiovascular symptoms and findings include palpitations, lightheadedness, unexplained/unexpected hypertension and/or hypotension, palpitations, chest discomfort or pain (usually non-anginal in character), vascular malformations such as aneurysms or hemorrhoids or hemangiomas or telangiectasias).

Gastrointestinal: Common gastrointestinal symptoms include pain/inflammation (often migratory) in one or more segments of the GI tract, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal discomfort/pain, abdominal bloating (usually shortly following meals), unexplained/unexpected fluctuations in appetite and/or weight, queasiness, nausea (vomiting is relatively uncommon), and diarrhea (or "soft stools") and/or constipation (often alternating). Blood in the stool can happen but is pretty uncommon.

Urinary: Common urinary symptoms include unusual frequency of urination, difficulty initiating urination, inability to fully empty the bladder, and painful urination (as if a urinary tract infection is present, except that testing can't find clear evidence of infection). Flank or abdominal pain from kidney stones can happen but is not all that common. Blood in the urine can happen but is pretty uncommon.

Genital Tract: Other than decreased libido and erectile dysfunction and possible fertility issues, genital tract symptoms are uncommon in men but may include inflammation of the prostate or other parts of the genital tract. In women with MCAS, genital tract symptoms are common and include an inflamed and/or itchy vulva and/or vagina (often mistakenly attributed to, and treated as, bacterial or yeast infections even though no evidence of infection can be found), inappropriate/dysfunctional uterine/menstrual bleeding, and painful intercourse. Endometriosis seems somewhat common, too.

Pregnancy: Women who have MCAS also can have decreased libido and fertility challenges. Women with MCAS who become pregnant sometimes experience early miscarriages, excessively severe or prolonged vomiting ("hyperemesis gravidarum"), the assortment of high blood pressure and other problems collectively called pre-eclampsia, and pre-term labor. In delivery, women with MCAS sometimes find difficulties tolerating, or getting relief from, anesthetics.

Muscular: Common muscular symptoms include migratory pain and weakness.

Skeletal: Common skeletal symptoms include migratory pain. Fractures are uncommon but can happen from loss of skeletal strength, and these include vertebral fractures which can lead to loss of height.

Joint: Common joint symptoms include migratory pain; migratory swelling and even redness, too, can happen, but usually are not as prominent as pain.

Neurologic: Common neurologic symptoms include headache (including migraines), episodic lightheadedness/dizziness/vertigo (which can happen either when getting up or even when lying down or sitting or after already been up for a while) (total loss of consciousness can happen but is much less common than lightheadedness), tingling/numbness (most commonly in the hands and feet but potentially anywhere), weakness, tics/tremors, and a wide variety of sleep disruptions (most commonly insomnia and frequent waking and non-restorative sleep but also excessive sleep, sleepwalking or sleep talking, sleep paralysis, or night terrors).

Psychiatric: Common psychiatric symptoms include anxiety (sometimes even to the point of panic), depression, mood lability, anger, attention deficit, and a wide variety of aspects of cognitive dysfunction, most commonly issues with memory, word-finding and concentration. "Disassociation" or "depersonalization" is occasionally seen. Frankly psychotic behaviors (e.g., auditory or visual hallucinations) are fairly uncommon.

Endocrinology: Common endocrinologic/metabolic issues include delayed or premature puberty, excessively painful and/or irregular periods, excessive menstrual bleeding, weak bones, thyroid abnormalities, high cholesterol or triglycerides, high glucose levels (usually diagnosed as diabetes mellitus) or low glucose levels (sometimes rapid alternation among normal and low and/or high levels), and selective abnormalities in absorbing or transporting or using certain important minerals and vitamins (e.g., iron).

Hematologic: Common hematologic and clotting system issues include modest abnormalities in blood counts, easy bruising, and easy bleeding (for example, excessive menstrual bleeding or easy nosebleeds). Excessive blood clotting is a good bit less common than easy bruising/bleeding.

Immunologic: Common immunologic issues include prolific and/or unusual sensitivities/reactivities/allergies, impaired healing, an unusual extent of autoimmune diseases, increased susceptibility to infection, and difficulty recovering from infection.

 

Mast Cell Activation Syndrome causes chronic multisystem inflammation ± allergic-type phenomena ± abnormalities in growth/development in potentially any tissue(s), so any patient who “fits the profile” and hasn’t been identified, with appropriate work-up of the various individual problems, to have any other disease which better accounts for the patient’s full range of problems is a reasonable candidate

Although I appreciate the information, I am hesitant to completely believe I have MCAS yet. All the symptoms you list above could happen for a number of different conditions. If someone is experiencing neurological symptoms (which you list several and very common ones) does not necessarily mean MCAS is what they are dealing with. There are other conditions that share some of the symptoms you list. As Dr. Affrin mentioned in his video, there are ways to test for MCAS (not easy ways, necessarily) so until completely believing that everyone who has a vaccine reaction has MCAS it may be best for people to try to get tested for it first. I am not saying you are incorrect, but am saying testing is the only (almost) full proof way of knowing.

What's the test one needs to undergo to diagnose MCAS?


   
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(@wynnwolter)
Active Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 47
 

Anybody dealt with long COVID after after having the vaccine and then getting COVID? I believe I am dealing with long covid (even though I’m only 11 days out from initial infection) I have very similar symptoms that I had after getting my vaccine. Really just want to know if anyone has recovered from long covid? At least with the vaccine I knew it would come to an end but I’m feeling pretty hopeless with this.


   
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