Vesties’ Village

Notifications
Clear all

Vestibular Vision Therapies

6 Posts
5 Users
0 Likes
949 Views
(@akenealy)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

Hi All: 

 

A neuro ent recently recommended that I pursue vision therapy and optometry evaluation as a next step. He diagnosed me with uncompensated vestibular neuritis and thought my right eye (side with vestibular damage) could be helped.

Like most of this vestibular journey, I’m out of my depth. Do any of you wise people have experience with this?

I’ve felt for a long time that my vision was outta whack, my eyes haven’t felt coordinated. 

Thanks for any advice and experiences you can share.

 

Anne


   
Quote
(@chandra)
VeDA Staff
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 12
 

Hi Anne,

I would recommend that you see a NeuroVision specialists or Neuro-Ophthalmologist for a vision evaluation if you’re currently seeing a neurotologist/otologist. You are more than welcome to look for a provider within our Clinician Directory. Sometimes people do not see any providers within the area selected, so I would be happy to help you locate a provider within your area if contact [email protected].

Gaze therapy, also called gaze stabilization therapy is a form of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy (VRT). You would work with a Physical Therapist, and sometimes depending on the office an optometrist or ophthalmologist. They would provide you with a series of exercises so help retrain your Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) so the triggers that would normally cause you to get dizzy are no longer, or the symptoms are reduced.

Here are some articles for you:

Labyrinthitis and Vestibular Neuritis

Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy

Vision Challenges with Vestibular Disorders


   
ReplyQuote
(@akenealy)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 7
Topic starter  

@chandra Thanks so very much for your help, Chandra. I’m going to read through this and will probably have questions for you.


   
ReplyQuote
(@frankbkelly)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 10
 

https://www.mytorontophysio.com/services/concussion-vestibular-physiotherapy"}{"1":420 }">Numerous illnesses, such as inner ear issues, neurological disorders, drug side effects, dehydration, and more can result in dizziness and vertigo. Sometimes, avoiding particular triggers, getting enough rest, and maintaining hydration can help reduce the sensations of dizziness and vertigo. Depending on the underlying reason, there are several treatment methods available for dizziness and vertigo. Physical therapists and occasionally, depending on the office, optometrists or ophthalmologists would be your coworkers. They would give you a set of exercises to assist retrain your Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex, preventing the triggers that would typically make you feel lightheaded or at least lessening the symptoms.


   
ReplyQuote
(@irenej)
Active Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 5
 

Posted by: @akenealy

Hi All: 

 

A neuro ent recently recommended that I pursue vision therapy and optometry evaluation as a next step. He diagnosed me with uncompensated vestibular neuritis and thought my right eye (side with vestibular damage) could be helped.

Like most of this vestibular journey, I’m out of my depth. Do any of you wise people have experience with this?

I’ve felt for a long time that my vision was outta whack, my eyes haven’t felt coordinated. 

Thanks for any advice and experiences you can share.

 

Anne

Vestibular rehabilitation often includes essential elements like balance training, aerobic activities, and exercises to enhance the vestibulo-ocular reflex. It's suggested to begin this rehabilitation once the acute phase has passed for the best results. This comprehensive approach can be truly beneficial in improving your vestibular health and overall well-being

 


   
ReplyQuote
 Hope
(@stenu)
New Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 2
 

Hi Ann,

I can see how your vestibular problems could overwhelm you. Since I've experienced a similar trip, I can connect. My vision and balance also worried me when I was told I had vestibular neuritis. Nonetheless, the physiotherapy and vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) I underwent had a big impact on me. My recovery was greatly aided by these specialist services, which were designed to increase balance and coordination.

This post was modified 6 months ago by Ms. Cynthia Ryan MBA

   
ReplyQuote