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Recurrent BPPV Plus neck pain/dizziness and ear popping

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(@alanna)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

I am 53.  For 3 years I have been dealing with chronic recurrent BPPV in my left ear.  Now I feel like I also may have vestibular migraine or possibly cervicogenic dizziness--I have ear popping and dizziness and pain in my neck at times even when the BPPV is not active.  I feel like if I could find out the cause of my recurrent BPPV, and I could stay spin-free for a while. that my anxiety/vestibular issues might all go away. I also have past neck trauma so the cervicogenic dizziness  fits too.

I cannot seem to find a cause for my BPPV.  No one seems interested in exploring that with me.  My hypotheses are 1. Electrolyte imbalance 2. Low blood pressure/sugar when I don't eat often enough 3. nutrient issues (I am Whole foods plant based) 4. menopause/bone loss 5. Problems with Circulation of inner ear fluid due to tense muscles in my neck/history of cervical spine trauma.

Has anyone linked their BBPV to a "cause."  I am healthy and thin, blood work is good, and I notice more BPPV episodes following strenuous exercise or when I do not eat for a few hours (I used to do intermittent fasting but do not anymore).

Has anyone been able to cure their recurrent BPPV?  I feel like I am so alone in this.  I wonder if hormone therapy might help.  Desperate for any hope.

Also, who have people gone to for evaluations of all the various possible causes?  I am having vestibular testing done soon.  I do not expect it will reveal much, but I guess it could.

 

 


   
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(@lahouariapretty)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1
 

I'm so sorry that you have to struggle with this disease. As far as I know, it can progress to severe forms.


   
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(@tabby)
Highly Active Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 438
 

Posted by: @lahouariapretty

I'm so sorry that you have to struggle with this disease. As far as I know, it can progress to severe forms.

That was helpful!

 


   
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(@margaret2022)
Very Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 335
 

Posted by: @alanna

I am 53.  For 3 years I have been dealing with chronic recurrent BPPV in my left ear.  Now I feel like I also may have vestibular migraine or possibly cervicogenic dizziness--I have ear popping and dizziness and pain in my neck at times even when the BPPV is not active.  I feel like if I could find out the cause of my recurrent BPPV, and I could stay spin-free for a while. that my anxiety/vestibular issues might all go away. I also have past neck trauma so the cervicogenic dizziness  fits too.

I cannot seem to find a cause for my BPPV.  No one seems interested in exploring that with me.  My hypotheses are 1. Electrolyte imbalance 2. Low blood pressure/sugar when I don't eat often enough 3. nutrient issues (I am Whole foods plant based) 4. menopause/bone loss 5. Problems with Circulation of inner ear fluid due to tense muscles in my neck/history of cervical spine trauma.

Has anyone linked their BBPV to a "cause."  I am healthy and thin, blood work is good, and I notice more BPPV episodes following strenuous exercise or when I do not eat for a few hours (I used to do intermittent fasting but do not anymore).

Has anyone been able to cure their recurrent BPPV?  I feel like I am so alone in this.  I wonder if hormone therapy might help.  Desperate for any hope.

Also, who have people gone to for evaluations of all the various possible causes?  I am having vestibular testing done soon.  I do not expect it will reveal much, but I guess it could.

 

 

hi alana

sorry you are going through this, vertigo dizziness is horrible when it doesn’t just wanna leave. Have you gotten testing for it? What kind? Were you tried on any medications? Were you ever officially diagnosed? There’s so many questions sorry. A lot of dizziness lately pointed to vaccine injuries or post COVID symptoms. Now days anyway. But your issue has been on going for 3 years. Have you been to physio therapy? Any scans done? MRI?CT? Curious to see what kind of testing your doctor has done. Do you have other symptoms along side with the dizziness/vertigo? Have you gotten covid recently? Sometimes that makes things worse. Just saying maybe you might have been feeling ok at one point but then got covid and third spewed up again or worse. My advice is to keep looking for answers. Since my what ever issue is going on which I still don’t have answers I’m still looking I’m now seeing a functional medicine doctor. I’m hoping she can help me. I’ve done it all ..the tests.. some medication.. not long durations…and still the same actually worse since I got covid couple weeks ago. I keep looking online and looking for anyone with similar issues…I’m just so tired of it now. Hope to hear from you soon feel better. 

 


   
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(@aatu18)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 5
 

@margaret2022 I have also noticed when I don’t eat on time or there is a long break between meals I feel extreme dizziness and vertigo. I am suffering from vestibular migraine over 3 years now and share some of your symptoms. Please let us know if anything you try makes it better. For me it’s some exercise. I’m also only 37 years old 


   
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(@kimbright)
Active Member
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 6
 

Posted by: @aatu18

@margaret2022 I have also noticed when I don’t eat on time or there is a long break between meals I feel extreme dizziness and vertigo. I am suffering from vestibular migraine over 3 years now and share some of your symptoms. Please let us know if anything you try makes it better. For me it’s some exercise. I’m also only 37 years old 

 


   
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(@kimbright)
Active Member
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 6
 

Does anybody else notice when you watch TV or look at your iPhone? Did you get a balance by looking at it dizzy little bit? I’m trying to read moves fast on the TV screen and I really would like to know how to deal with these problems on a day-to-day basis, anybody have a good regimen I’m afraid to leave the house because I’m trying to make it a dizzy spell outside the house. What do you guys do if you do when you do get a dizzy spell outside the house what is your regimen? Please let me know. Thank you. 


   
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(@kimbright)
Active Member
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 6
 

I’m trying to write when I watch TV and there’s something fast moving it makes me dizzy or if I watch motion moving it makes me dizzy. Seems like a lot of it has to do with my eye movements and of course my head movements I was just wondering how other people deal with this and what you guys do for regimen thanks 


   
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(@mimran)
New Member
Joined: 11 months ago
Posts: 2
 

@kimbright i have a bit similar feeling while watching any movie or slow motion program


   
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(@irenej)
Active Member
Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 5
 

Posted by: @alanna

I am 53.  For 3 years I have been dealing with chronic recurrent BPPV in my left ear.  Now I feel like I also may have vestibular migraine or possibly cervicogenic dizziness--I have ear popping and dizziness and pain in my neck at times even when the BPPV is not active.  I feel like if I could find out the cause of my recurrent BPPV, and I could stay spin-free for a while. that my anxiety/vestibular issues might all go away. I also have past neck trauma so the cervicogenic dizziness  fits too.

I cannot seem to find a cause for my BPPV.  No one seems interested in exploring that with me.  My hypotheses are 1. Electrolyte imbalance 2. Low blood pressure/sugar when I don't eat often enough 3. nutrient issues (I am Whole foods plant based) 4. menopause/bone loss 5. Problems with Circulation of inner ear fluid due to tense muscles in my neck/history of cervical spine trauma.

Has anyone linked their BBPV to a "cause."  I am healthy and thin, blood work is good, and I notice more BPPV episodes following strenuous exercise or when I do not eat for a few hours (I used to do intermittent fasting but do not anymore).

Has anyone been able to cure their recurrent BPPV?  I feel like I am so alone in this.  I wonder if hormone therapy might help.  Desperate for any hope.

Also, who have people gone to for evaluations of all the various possible causes?  I am having vestibular testing done soon.  I do not expect it will reveal much, but I guess it could.

 

 

Hi,
You should be pleased that you have arranged a vestibular test. A neurologist with experience in vestibular issues or an ENT specialist may be able to help. I suffered vestibular migraines, and after trying everything else, I decided to look into chiropractic care. It greatly enhanced how I was able to control my symptoms. I had less instances of vertigo and the corresponding neck pain after seeing my chiropractor, who concentrated on my neck and upper spine. It's a matter of personal preference, so what works for one individual might not be suitable for another.

 


   
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(@cthompson14)
Professional Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 1
 

@irenej

Hello,

I'm truly sorry to hear about the challenges you've been facing with chronic BPPV and related symptoms. It's undoubtedly a frustrating and isolating experience. Your detailed exploration of potential causes and your proactive approach to seeking solutions are commendable.

Regarding BPPV, it's essential to consider the possibility of its recurrence due to factors such as incomplete treatment or involvement of different canals. Ensuring a thorough examination that includes all possible canal involvement by a knowledgeable healthcare professional is crucial.

Exploring potential connections with vitamin D3 deficiency, trauma, and osteoporosis aligns with emerging research. However, it's wise to consult with your primary care physician before supplementing to rule out any unnecessary interventions.

Considering your experience with vestibular symptoms, neck pain, and a history of cervical spine trauma, consulting with an orthopedic physician is a prudent step. They can assess and address any orthopedic concerns related to your neck. 

Seeking the expertise of a vestibular physical therapist is a valuable recommendation. Their specialized knowledge can help in addressing the interconnected issues of BPPV, neck pain, and overall vestibular function. Be sure to communicate your concerns and symptoms clearly during your vestibular testing for a comprehensive evaluation. Often times I see my clients with BPPV have neck pain because they develop a fear of moving their head due to fear of creating dizziness symptoms. Without normal movement, neck pain can occur. I also recommend ensuring that the physical therapist you choose to work with is vestibular-certified. This means that they have additional training compared to other physical therapists. 

Additionally, exploring resources such as Dr. Shin C. Beh's book "Victory Over Vestibular Migraine" and Alicia Wolfe's content on The Dizzy Cook website can provide valuable insights and coping strategies.

Remember, you're not alone in this journey, and seeking support from healthcare professionals who understand the complexities of vestibular disorders can make a significant difference. I hope you find the answers and relief you're seeking, and that your upcoming vestibular testing provides valuable insights into your condition.

Wishing you the very best on your path to recovery.

All the best,

Carly

 

 


   
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