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Covid-19 Vaccine side effects

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Kevin007
(@kevin)
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Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 12
 

@sunrise its the jab causing clots, see my died suddenly film comment

 


   
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Kevin007
(@kevin)
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@sunrise watch died suddenly on rumble there are huge clots too- white fibrous man made clots all over dead bodies; all were vaxxed, this is depopulation, im sorry.


   
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Kevin007
(@kevin)
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Kevin007
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help
 help
(@elenao)
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@kevin I did not get the vaccine. Neither me nor any of my family. My 14 years-daughter has been severely affected by restrictions imposed to unvaccinated. She couldn't continue therapies and swimming for her scoliosis and now she has one year since is in bracelets. I agree that are many demons ahead but adding this movie to this forum is quite disturbing. Please, let the people gain their health again. Some scenes in the movie are exaggerated, and some are real but please, those vaccine-injured should not look at it. I hardly watched myself. 

Take care and look for homeopathy! Classic one, Vithoulkas. I had many issues in the past and now 15 years without any pills. Covid (delta wave) was piece of cake for me with no day off from my online IT job. 45 years, female, unvaccinated.
I really regret what happened to you and so many young people. 🙁


   
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creativecat
(@creativecat)
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@margaret2022 I know a lot of folks have asked for success stories, and I'm hoping my journey can provide some hope for those experiencing a long recovery.  I've hesitated to write anything, as I'm still dealing with symptoms, but overall things have definitely improved, and where I once believed I may never recover, I now have hope I may get back to my old self yet -- even if it's taking much longer than I wanted.  Also, I don't want anyone to be discouraged by the fact that it's taking so long for me.  I've read many success stories where folks have recovered in a matter of months -- even weeks.  But for those still experiencing bad symptoms after a year or more, I hope this will help. 

To provide some background, I began experiencing extreme headaches, dizziness, nausea, head pressure and facial flushing within 24 hours after receiving my second dose of Moderna.  Initially I believed this was the usual immune response -- but after a week went by, I realized this was not normal.  I went through a string of blood tests, CT scans, MRIs, lumbar puncture and countless visits to specialists including ENTs, neurologists, cardiologists and gynecologists all looking for an answer to this mysterious onset of daily symptoms.  Not a day went by where I felt even remotely normal. And nothing I did seemed to provide any relief.  Over the counter pain medication didn't touch the headaches, and the nausea was persistent no matter what I took.  This greatly impacted my ability to work, as I'm in a technical profession requiring a lot of screen time.  Where I had just started making inroads into this career, I found myself having to step back.  It was extremely discouraging. And, more than that, the failure to find any treatable cause for the problems was heart breaking.  Each negative test made me feel as though I was helpless to do anything to get my life back. 

Finally, about eight months in, my neurologist ordered a tilt table test and discovered I have POTS (Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome ).  This condition can cause a variety of symptoms, including fatigue, headaches, dizziness and nausea.  I started employing some of the recommended lifestyle changes (drinking 2-3L water/ day, increase salt intake), as well as started on florinef,  Sadly, I didn't see any change at this point.  At the year marker, I was very discouraged.  But -- finally....in month 13-14, I started to notice some slight improvement.  I noticed this was associated with an increased dose of the florinef.  To this day, I'm not sure if it's time or the medications/ lifestyle changes that helped.  But the important thing was that I started to feel small improvements at around 15 months.  The progress wasn't linear though, I would have relapses that were just as bad as I had felt before, which made me question whether the improvements were real or simply an ebb and flow.  But at 16 months, I feel comfortable in saying that I've made some objective improvements.  The headaches no longer wake me in the night, making sleep much easier.  The nausea, although still there, isn't as regular.  The "bubble headed feeling" I felt nearly every day (a combination of headache and pressure), is no longer there all the time.  I have days where I feel much better.  I still have bad days too, but the good days give me hope because I never had really any before.  I've even started taking on some additional work in hopes of regaining some of the ground I lost over the past. 

I hope this may help those suffering for an extended period of time and worried that this is permanent.  I feared that exact thing myself.  At a year, I was certain my fate was sealed.  All the failed medications, failed treatments and shear extended amount of time being this sick, made me fear my life was forever changed.  But I'm beginning to see light at the end of the tunnel.  I find myself planning again -- something I haven't done for over a year because I had no sense of future.  It certainly has helped that I have a primary care doctor who has taken all my symptoms seriously and never stopped searching for a solution.  Having her support has helped a lot.  My advice to anyone going through anything similar to my experience, would be to keep searching for an answer and don't give up. 

I hope my journey can help someone suffering.  But I also hope it doesn't discourage anyone early in their journey.  From what I've read, recovery lengths vary a lot.  But I'm relieved to say that I'm getting there even though it took me a lot longer than some.  I live in the States, so I'm preparing to head out for Thanksgiving dinner with my family.  Something I wouldn't have even considered a year ago.  It's been an awful, horrible year.  And I'm more than ready to start celebrating again.  Hope everyone finds some relief this holiday season.

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by creativecat

   
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Thisistoomuch
(@margaret2022)
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Posted by: @sunrise

@margaret2022 

 

Coagulation disorder is a phenomenon that is talked about so much, and microclots are a possible cause for bruises, which are a symptom that quite a few people report.

And many affected people describe that the symptoms appear in waves, there are periods of aggravation and periods of improvement.

This natural evolution of the symptoms overlaps with the action of various remedies and makes it very difficult to correctly evaluate the action of each remedy.

Because every aggravation or improvement that occurs may not be determined by that remedy, but by the processes of the disease, which, in fact, are rather difficult to master, compared to the effects, relatively moderate, that different remedies, in the right doses, can determine.

Therefore, a very good check of the effect of a remedy is necessary, in order to be able to state for sure that it helps or damages.

my INR and PTT levels were within range. CBC normal values. That was reassuring. I really should see a natural path to get some advice when taking natural herbs, these practitioners know what’s best and labs values that can help them determine what and how much I should be taking. I have reached out to two. I just need to set up an appointment. The only issues is this is not covered by Ontario health insurance.OHIP. I’ll update after my appointments with whoever. I was supposed to have a follow up with ENT on Friday but he canceled. So I’m waiting for the rebook date.

 


   
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Spooky
(@spooky)
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Joined: 1 year ago
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Hey folks; I've been dealing with post vax issues for 16+ months now. At this point I am down to just a few real main symptoms that occur episodically; paresthesia (burning limbs / face) and dizziness. I've noticed that now any time something affects my ears/vestibular system (changes in elevation, head congestion, etc.) I become dizzy. This never happened before my vax injury, in fact, I would have had a hard time describing what it was to be dizzy before all of this. My ENT said that there is now an 18% difference (via caloric test) in my vestibular response between my left and right ears, but stated that was "subclinical" and didn't really have any recommendations for what to do about it. They did say it might get better on it's own, but that's little consolation. Has anyone else had this experience? Is there anything that can be done about this? Does it get better? Thanks.


   
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Betth
(@betth)
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Posted by: @sickofthis

I previously asked here about drinking coffee again. Has anyone successfully added it back into your life? I think it would help mask/improve my brain fog symptoms, plus I just really love coffee. 

Those that have tried, did it make your symptoms worse at first and then did your body get use to it?


I began to drink less coffee, and I began to want it less. No more than a cup of coffee a day, or even less. The main thing is that the coffee is of high quality.

 


   
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Fpuck pfizer
(@regretim)
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Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 4
 

Hey we have an uncensored vax server up and running.. feel free to join to share ideas and helpful tips we currently have members getting positive results and improvements, 2 who have recovered fully

 

Link to discord: https://discord.gg/mWeeeWF6


   
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Tinnitus from Covid Vaccine
(@ksharky13)
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Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 120
 

Update from me:  Mt tinnitus seems to be getting more noticeable more often, and slightly worse.  The regimen of vitamins and supplements I’ve been taking (Turmeric, B12, D3, Krill oil and Zinc) does not seem to be having an effect. There are others I haven't tried yet (Glutathione, Devil's claw, etc.) that other people have indicated helped them. I’m going on 11 months since the tinnitus first showed up and while I seemed to have had a couple of periods of “getting better”, it now feels like this is going to be a permanent situation. I also still have a level of brain fog / anxiety too, which is not fun.  I just don’t feel like the same person I was before this happened. 

It’s all mild enough where I can live and function OK, so I am thankful for that. It’s just annoying and scary that these vaccines could have so many horrible adverse side effects for so many people.  Who knows what side effects/conditions will develop over the coming years?  I know the traffic on this forum has dropped way off and I just haven’t seen very many stories where people had their tinnitus resolve.  I have seen a few where people indicated that it took 14-15 months to start to feel “back to normal”.  That provides some level of hope.  If anyone has had any success with resolving their tinnitus, please take a few minutes to tell your story on this forum.


   
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didigo
(@stars182)
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Posted by: @ksharky13

Update from me:  Mt tinnitus seems to be getting more noticeable more often, and slightly worse.  The regimen of vitamins and supplements I’ve been taking (Turmeric, B12, D3, Krill oil and Zinc) does not seem to be having an effect. There are others I haven't tried yet (Glutathione, Devil's claw, etc.) that other people have indicated helped them. I’m going on 11 months since the tinnitus first showed up and while I seemed to have had a couple of periods of “getting better”, it now feels like this is going to be a permanent situation. I also still have a level of brain fog / anxiety too, which is not fun.  I just don’t feel like the same person I was before this happened. 

It’s all mild enough where I can live and function OK, so I am thankful for that. It’s just annoying and scary that these vaccines could have so many horrible adverse side effects for so many people.  Who knows what side effects/conditions will develop over the coming years?  I know the traffic on this forum has dropped way off and I just haven’t seen very many stories where people had their tinnitus resolve.  I have seen a few where people indicated that it took 14-15 months to start to feel “back to normal”.  That provides some level of hope.  If anyone has had any success with resolving their tinnitus, please take a few minutes to tell your story on this forum.

 

15 months here since tinnitus started, and no sign of improvement.

In my opinion I'm pretty sure it's permanent. I've talked to people who have had tinnitus after a vaccine (not Pfizer or COVID) but flu or yellow fever vaccines, one of them had it for over 15 years...

The good news is that both people lived normally and got used to tinnitus by leading normal lives.

I've also seen cases where the intensity of the tinnitus has decreased (on case Pfizer or AZ vaccine), but I suspect it could be more habituation than the cure.

 


   
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Tinnitus from Covid Vaccine
(@ksharky13)
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Posts: 120
 

Posted by: @stars182

Posted by: @ksharky13

Update from me:  Mt tinnitus seems to be getting more noticeable more often, and slightly worse.  The regimen of vitamins and supplements I’ve been taking (Turmeric, B12, D3, Krill oil and Zinc) does not seem to be having an effect. There are others I haven't tried yet (Glutathione, Devil's claw, etc.) that other people have indicated helped them. I’m going on 11 months since the tinnitus first showed up and while I seemed to have had a couple of periods of “getting better”, it now feels like this is going to be a permanent situation. I also still have a level of brain fog / anxiety too, which is not fun.  I just don’t feel like the same person I was before this happened. 

It’s all mild enough where I can live and function OK, so I am thankful for that. It’s just annoying and scary that these vaccines could have so many horrible adverse side effects for so many people.  Who knows what side effects/conditions will develop over the coming years?  I know the traffic on this forum has dropped way off and I just haven’t seen very many stories where people had their tinnitus resolve.  I have seen a few where people indicated that it took 14-15 months to start to feel “back to normal”.  That provides some level of hope.  If anyone has had any success with resolving their tinnitus, please take a few minutes to tell your story on this forum.

 

15 months here since tinnitus started, and no sign of improvement.

In my opinion I'm pretty sure it's permanent. I've talked to people who have had tinnitus after a vaccine (not Pfizer or COVID) but flu or yellow fever vaccines, one of them had it for over 15 years...

The good news is that both people lived normally and got used to tinnitus by leading normal lives.

I've also seen cases where the intensity of the tinnitus has decreased (on case Pfizer or AZ vaccine), but I suspect it could be more habituation than the cure.

 Thanks for the quick and informative reply. Unfortunately I am slowly coming to the realization that the tinnitus is permanent. It seems to be the only side effect that doesn’t resolve over time. I wish the medical community would figure out what exactly these damn vaccines did to cause tinnitus. I was hoping it was inflammation that would subside, but it obviously damaged something. The worse part of this is that it’s highly likely that it was our own body’s immune response that created all of the havoc. I probably would have been fine if I had not gotten the booster. I was 8 months from my second pfizer dose and no issues. About 6 weeks after the booster is when the tinnitus and other crap started. I just hope it doesn’t get progressively worse and I can habituate over time. It’s already robbed me of things I like to do, like play my electric guitar and go to shows, concerts, etc. I hope we all get better with time. Let me l know if you ever start to have any luck with your tinnitus. Thanks again and take care. 

 


   
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Jason Hendrick
(@plandistry)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 61
 

Hello everyone.

I've had a long absence but I am back for a follow-up. Please copy and paste this data to your phone/computer for safe keeping in the event it disappears.

My wife has undergone testing by some of the top experts in the nation, and the summation is - she has vaccine induced POTS, but that all of it may be Mast Cell Activation Syndrome initiated or exacerbated by the mRNA vaccine.  We believe based on all available evidence that this is actually what the vaccine is doing to many, and potentially most people. The reason this is so hard to pin down is because the systems are varied based on which system is impacted and the triggers are varied.

I STRONGLY encourage anyone with any vaccine side effects to examine Mast Cell Degranulation, MCAS/MCAD, and related systems it impacts, and the symptoms it can present. My theory is mRNA transcode errors cause the body to view these impacted areas as being pathogenic, damaged/injured, or foreign invaders. As a response to this, the body rushes in mast cells, degranulates them as if there is an injury at the particularly impacted site/organ, or even systemically in some people.

You can determine which area has mRNA transcode errors by examining where you have 'flare ups'. I am presenting symptoms of mast cell degranulation events on a per-site basis below to help you extrapolate where the mRNA transcode is failing, causing the body to view the mRNA as a injury/pathogen/etc.  Applying this technique SHOULD allow most people to do some targeted mast cell stabilization to those areas with appropriate therapies/modalities/supplements, etc.

EXAMPLE: If the Ophthalmologic systems are impacted, support for the eyes may prove essential. Ketotifen or Hypochlorous Eye drops to stabilize mast cells. Lutein/Zeaxanthin for supplemental support. A good anti-oxidant eye drop like Bio-Pure (with lubrication) may actually sporadically resolve mRNA errors pinned to the cells of the eye and drop degranulation events significantly.

Systemic Mast Cell Stabilization techniques can be implemented along with targeted responses to impacted areas. For example you can take a probiotic with histamine dissolving strains such as 'Mood Super Strains' which have all of the system mast stabilizer strains. You can increase Vitamin C (Ester-C or Lipsomal are best IMO). You can add Dihydroquercetin or Quecetin, Bovine Colostrum, Humic/Fulvic Minerals, increased D3/K2, Meriva, Apigenin, Myricetin, DAO, etc.  Then add in stress reduction techniques, good sleep, and most importantly dietary/FOODMAP type of changes. This may provide systemic relief, especially when combined with targeted therapies for specifically impacted areas.

First, use my information below to determine impacted systems;

Common constitutional symptoms of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS) include fatigue, malaise, suddenly feeling hot or cold, inappropriate sweats, flushing, unprovoked changes in appetite or weight.

Dermatologic: Common dermatologic symptoms of MCAS include rashes and lesions of many sorts (e.g., migratory and waxing/waning patches of redness, acne-like folliculitis), itching, flushing (sometimes migratory), swelling (often migratory), pregnancy-like purplish lines/bands ("striae") about the abdomen, flanks, armpits and/or hips, redness in the track of a scratch ("dermatographism"), poor healing, and nail issues (e.g., brittleness, longitudinal ridging, "white spots" (dyshydrotic eczema); ingrown nails, too, are seen sometimes).

Ophthalmologic: Common eye symptoms include irritation and inflammation of the eyes (often described as feeling "sandy," "gritty," "dry," and usually without any clear infection to account for it), usually fairly brief episodes of difficulty focusing vision, eyelid tremors/tics ("blepharospasm"), and unusual sensitivity to either bright lights or lights of certain colors.

Otologic: Common ear symptoms include ringing in the ears and irritation and inflammation in the ears. Less common are a sense of chronic fluid build-up in the ears, hearing loss (one-sided or two-sided), or uncomfortable heightened hearing sensitivity.

Nasal/Oral: Common oral and nasal symptoms include ulcers and pain (sometimes described as "burning"), white patches about the tongue or other surfaces, swelling of the tongue or other surfaces, sensitivity and/or deterioration of the teeth and/or gums despite reasonably good attention to dental and gum hygiene, alterations in the sense of taste, throat irritation/soreness/inflammation and/or hoarseness (without any infection clearly being present to account for it), difficulty swallowing, congestion of the sinuses and nose, sores up inside the nose, and nasal and post-nasal drip.

Lymphatic: Common symptoms of the lymphatic system include a diffusely migratory, waxing/waning enlargement and/or irritation/inflammation of the lymph nodes, typically about the neck and in either armpit and to either side of the groin, but possibly in other areas, too (including in the spleen, the body's largest lymph node, which often is felt as a left upper quadrant abdominal discomfort).

Respiratory: Common respiratory tract symptoms include painful discomfort at any level of the respiratory tract, bronchitis, cough, shortness of breath (often modest and inconstant; "from time to time, I just suddenly can't catch a deep breath" is the most common phrasing MCAS patients use to describe their shortness of breath). Frank wheezing is not seen all that often, and when it's present during the episodes of shortness of breath, it's usually fairly subtle. Obstructive sleep apnea can happen, too, even in patients who are not morbidly obese.

Cardiovascular: Common cardiovascular symptoms and findings include palpitations, lightheadedness, unexplained/unexpected hypertension and/or hypotension, palpitations, chest discomfort or pain (usually non-anginal in character), vascular malformations such as aneurysms or hemorrhoids or hemangiomas or telangiectasias).

Gastrointestinal: Common gastrointestinal symptoms include pain/inflammation (often migratory) in one or more segments of the GI tract, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal discomfort/pain, abdominal bloating (usually shortly following meals), unexplained/unexpected fluctuations in appetite and/or weight, queasiness, nausea (vomiting is relatively uncommon), and diarrhea (or "soft stools") and/or constipation (often alternating). Blood in the stool can happen but is pretty uncommon.

Urinary: Common urinary symptoms include unusual frequency of urination, difficulty initiating urination, inability to fully empty the bladder, and painful urination (as if a urinary tract infection is present, except that testing can't find clear evidence of infection). Flank or abdominal pain from kidney stones can happen but is not all that common. Blood in the urine can happen but is pretty uncommon.

Genital Tract: Other than decreased libido and erectile dysfunction and possible fertility issues, genital tract symptoms are uncommon in men but may include inflammation of the prostate or other parts of the genital tract. In women with MCAS, genital tract symptoms are common and include an inflamed and/or itchy vulva and/or vagina (often mistakenly attributed to, and treated as, bacterial or yeast infections even though no evidence of infection can be found), inappropriate/dysfunctional uterine/menstrual bleeding, and painful intercourse. Endometriosis seems somewhat common, too.

Pregnancy: Women who have MCAS also can have decreased libido and fertility challenges. Women with MCAS who become pregnant sometimes experience early miscarriages, excessively severe or prolonged vomiting ("hyperemesis gravidarum"), the assortment of high blood pressure and other problems collectively called pre-eclampsia, and pre-term labor. In delivery, women with MCAS sometimes find difficulties tolerating, or getting relief from, anesthetics.

Muscular: Common muscular symptoms include migratory pain and weakness.

Skeletal: Common skeletal symptoms include migratory pain. Fractures are uncommon but can happen from loss of skeletal strength, and these include vertebral fractures which can lead to loss of height.

Joint: Common joint symptoms include migratory pain; migratory swelling and even redness, too, can happen, but usually are not as prominent as pain.

Neurologic: Common neurologic symptoms include headache (including migraines), episodic lightheadedness/dizziness/vertigo (which can happen either when getting up or even when lying down or sitting or after already been up for a while) (total loss of consciousness can happen but is much less common than lightheadedness), tingling/numbness (most commonly in the hands and feet but potentially anywhere), weakness, tics/tremors, and a wide variety of sleep disruptions (most commonly insomnia and frequent waking and non-restorative sleep but also excessive sleep, sleepwalking or sleep talking, sleep paralysis, or night terrors).

Psychiatric: Common psychiatric symptoms include anxiety (sometimes even to the point of panic), depression, mood lability, anger, attention deficit, and a wide variety of aspects of cognitive dysfunction, most commonly issues with memory, word-finding and concentration. "Disassociation" or "depersonalization" is occasionally seen. Frankly psychotic behaviors (e.g., auditory or visual hallucinations) are fairly uncommon.

Endocrinology: Common endocrinologic/metabolic issues include delayed or premature puberty, excessively painful and/or irregular periods, excessive menstrual bleeding, weak bones, thyroid abnormalities, high cholesterol or triglycerides, high glucose levels (usually diagnosed as diabetes mellitus) or low glucose levels (sometimes rapid alternation among normal and low and/or high levels), and selective abnormalities in absorbing or transporting or using certain important minerals and vitamins (e.g., iron).

Hematologic: Common hematologic and clotting system issues include modest abnormalities in blood counts, easy bruising, and easy bleeding (for example, excessive menstrual bleeding or easy nosebleeds). Excessive blood clotting is a good bit less common than easy bruising/bleeding.

Immunologic: Common immunologic issues include prolific and/or unusual sensitivities/reactivities/allergies, impaired healing, an unusual extent of autoimmune diseases, increased susceptibility to infection, and difficulty recovering from infection.

 

Next, you need to find mast cell stabilizers and anti-oxidant/support therapies for the impacted systems and apply them appropriately and examine your success/failure, and adjust according. I may be recommended to apply systemic therapies and lifestyle changes along with targeted therapies. Top overall Mast Cell Stabilization substances are categorized here for you;

The “A” Team:

Quercetin – 2000 mg daily, dose divided
Green tea (EGCG, L-Theanine) – 2 to 3 cups daily. Supplement with 500 mg (175 mg of ECGC) twice daily
Curcumin (Meriva is a common brand name) – 1 to 4 g daily, dose divided
Chamomile tea (Apigenin, luteolin) – 1 to 2 cups before bed
Resveratrol – 20 mg twice daily
Diamine oxidase enzymes (DAO) – 2 capsules with each meal
Vitamin C – may need a non-citrus source such as rose hips – 1 to 3 g daily

The “B” Team:

Luteolin – 100 mg twice daily
Ginkgo biloba – 500 mg daily
Silymarin – 500-1000 mg daily, doses divided
Shea oil – 3 capsules daily
Ellagic acid – 500 mg daily
Pycnogenol – 500 to 1000 mg daily
Magnolia/Honokiol – 200 to 250 mg twice daily
Parthenolide (Feverfew) – 200 to 400 mg twice daily

The “C” Team:

Fiestin – 100 mg twice daily
Rutin – 200 mg daily
Genistein (isoflavone)
Mangostin (often taken as a juice) – 500 to 1000 mg daily
Xanthium (dihydroleucodeine, also known as cocklebur) – 6 to 9 capsules daily
Isatis (indoline) – 6 to 9 capsules daily

Other things to consider in MCAS:

Ensure you have sufficient magnesium levels, as a deficiency has been shown to induce the emergence of mast cells, particularly in the liver. Magnesium also has hundreds of other important functions in a healthy body.
Zinc is another mineral you should ensure you’re getting enough of because it is important in appropriate mast cell signalling.
Stress reduction is also important in stabilising mast cells. When you’re stressed, your body releases corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is associated with the activation of skin mast cells. Incorporate meditation, yoga, breathing exercises and other stress-reducing techniques into your daily life.
Maintaining a schedule is a great way to help stabilise your mast cells because they exhibit circadian rhythm patterns. Try to wake up and go to sleep at the same time each day. Also, avoid electronic screens before bed or wear a pair of blue-blocking glasses for better hormone regulation.
Correct gut dysbiosis – Correcting the balance of your gut microbiome has been shown to reduce inflammation and improve immune system health. Specifically, there are certain strains of probiotics that have been shown to help breakdown histamine, including:
Bifidobacterium adolescentis
Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron
Bacteroides fragilis
Lactobacillus rhamnosus
(Mood Superstrains is VERY good blend for Mast Cell IMO)

 

All of this should provide the catalyst on your road to recovery. Please share this with others. We've got concrete medical evidence now in terms of my wife after hundreds of thousands of dollars in testing from some of the top medical professionals in the fields related to such matters to feel confident enough to provide this data.

Disclaimer: Only your doctor can recommend treatments, and should be consulted before following any advice here. This is not medical advice and is only for research/documenting purposes.

 

 

 

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by Jason Hendrick

   
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Jason Hendrick
(@plandistry)
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Joined: 1 year ago
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Posted by: @creativecat

Finally, about eight months in, my neurologist ordered a tilt table test and discovered I have POTS (Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome ).  This condition can cause a variety of symptoms, including fatigue, headaches, dizziness and nausea.  I started employing some of the recommended lifestyle changes (drinking 2-3L water/ day, increase salt intake), as well as started on florinef,  Sadly, I didn't see any change at this point.  At the year marker, I was very discouraged.  But -- finally....in month 13-14, I started to notice some slight improvement.  I noticed this was associated with an increased dose of the florinef.  To this day, I'm not sure if it's time or the medications/ lifestyle changes that helped.  But the important thing was that I started to feel small improvements at around 15 months.  The progress wasn't linear though, I would have relapses that were just as bad as I had felt before, which made me question whether the improvements were real or simply an ebb and flow.  But at 16 months, I feel comfortable in saying that I've made some objective improvements.  The headaches no longer wake me in the night, making sleep much easier.  The nausea, although still there, isn't as regular.  The "bubble headed feeling" I felt nearly every day (a combination of headache and pressure), is no longer there all the time.  I have days where I feel much better.  I still have bad days too, but the good days give me hope because I never had really any before.  I've even started taking on some additional work in hopes of regaining some of the ground I lost over the past. 

 

It could be POTS induced by mast cell activation syndrome caused by mRNA transcode errors where the body views that mRNA as a pathogen/injury/etc. Florinef is a corticosteroid, and this, stabilizes MAST CELLS, and if it does provide some relief over time then I'd advise checking my most recent post regarding mRNA vaccine injury linked to Mast Cell Degranulation. It is very common for people suffering MCAS/MCAD to obtain some systemic relief with corticosteroids, and Florinef is quite good for this. Florinef is systemically assisting you to stabilize mast cells. However there are powerful lifestyle and mast cell therapies that may provide significant relief to you if continued over time.

Please reference my post and examine the data very closely.

 

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by Jason Hendrick

   
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